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unsigned value( unsigned n, unsigned low, unsigned high ){
    if( !(low <= high && high <= 32) )  exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    if( low == 0 && high == 32 )
        return n;
    else
        return n >> low & (1U << (high-low)) - 1;
}

imagine we had the following as n=11100011, low=2, and high=7.

by the time we reached the return statement i'd have this

00111000 & (00100000 - 00000001)

this would be

00111000 & 00011111

which would equal

00011000

but thats not right is it? Thats 24 while i want 00111000 which is 56

what am i doing wrong here? where did i screw up?

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2  
I don't know. What is the purpose of this function? (i.e. what is the rule that gives you 56?) –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 0:58
    
the function gets the value of the specified bitfield. at least it's supposed to. –  Painguy Apr 30 '12 at 1:08
    
Your left-shift has an off-by-one error. See my answer below. –  Adam Liss Apr 30 '12 at 1:10
    
OH WOW. i am blind as a bat. hahaha i feel stupid thanks :P For whatever reason I had this in my mind (high, low] –  Painguy Apr 30 '12 at 1:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to left-shift one more position before you subtract 1. That will extend the string of 1 bits one more position to the left, which is where the high bit resides.

return (n >> low) & ((1U << (high-low+1)) - 1);

Imagine the extreme case, where low = 0 and high = 32. Ignore the overflow, which is an artifact of the size of long, and do the calculation:

(n >> 0) & ((1U << 33) - 1)

The term on the left is just n, and the term on the right is a string of 32 1 bits.

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Looks like an off by one error:

n >> low = 11100011 >> 2 = 111000 = 56

Then to mask off the high bits, you're ANDing with high-low ones:

111000 & (1 << 5)-1

But (1 << 5)-1 = 11111, but you really want 111111 (otherwise you're ANDing out the leading bit, effectively subtracting 32 from the value). So instead, use:

return n >> low & (1U << (high - low + 1)) - 1;
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