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I have a Java program that uses threads. In my run method, I have:

public void run() {
    while(thread != null){
        repaint();
        System.out.println("hi");
        try {  
            Thread.sleep(1000);  
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {  
            break;  
        }  
    }
}

public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    // painting stuff
}

The problem is that the run method is executed, but the paintComponent section is not called. If this is not the right way to keep repainting the component, then how should I repaint it?

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1  
Is this block of code inside a class that extends a JComponent? (because paintComponent() is a JComponent method). –  cgull Apr 30 '12 at 1:37
3  
Please show us real code with decent formatting. Your current code suggests that paintComponent is within the run() method and that can't be true. So again, edit your question, clean up your code as much as possible and post code that makes sense, code that you're currently using, and give us more details on your problem. Assume that we don't know anything about code not shown and that we can't read your mind. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 30 '12 at 1:53
    
Try your hands on this example, Hopefully this might can help :-) –  nIcE cOw Apr 30 '12 at 6:37

4 Answers 4

Cal repaint from a Swing Timer. That will not block the GUI, and will happen at whatever interval specified in the timer. Of course, by the nature of Swing/AWT painting, if the timer is set to repeat too fast, calls to paint might be coalesced (effectively ignored).

Also, make sure the method is an override using:

@Override
public void paintComponent(Graphics g){
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You should only repaint a component when you need to (ie, when you update it).

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But in a game, I need to constantly update the screen. –  Anonymous181 Apr 30 '12 at 1:29
2  
Either trigger the repaint when you update something or use a clock. There is no such thing as "continuous" repainting. –  Hot Licks Apr 30 '12 at 1:31
    
@Anonymous181 If nothing has changed, there's no need to update the screen. Whenever you update the game state you should tell your component to repaint itself. –  Jeffrey Apr 30 '12 at 1:31
1  
@Anonymous181: all computing is discrete and nothing is truly continuous, and that includes time slices. Your game loop must choose a reasonable time slice and repaint then. The Swing paint manager will coalesce your repaint() requests if they come to fast and close. 1+ to the answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 30 '12 at 1:31
1  
And keep in mind that if you're sleeping in the UI thread then the system can't update. –  Hot Licks Apr 30 '12 at 1:33

Depending on what you're doing, you might also be interested in this. This is taken from Killer Game Programming in Java by Andrew Davison. He talks about active rendering. Your game loop is effectively:

public void run()
{
  while (running)
  {
    gameUpdate();                             // game state is updated
    gameRender();                             // render to a buffer
    paintScreen();                            // draw buffer to screen

    try
    {
      Thread.sleep(20);
    }
    catch (InterruptedException e) {;}
  }
}

And, the implementation of paint screen is (defined by a subclass of JComponent):

private void paintScreen()
{
  final Graphics2D g2d;

  try
  {
    g2d = (Graphics2D) this.getGraphics();
    if (g2d != null && (backbuffer != null))
    {
      g2d.drawImage(backbuffer, 0, 0, null);
    }

    Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().sync();       // sync the display on some systems [1]
    g2d.dispose();
  }
  catch (Exception e)
  {
    ;
  }
}

From the book:

[Note 1] The call to Tookkit.sync() ensures that the display is promptly updated. This is required for Linux, which doesn't automatically flush its display buffer. Without the sync() call, the animation may be only partially updated, creating a "tearing" effect.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have to call paint(g) for a heavy-weight container such as a JFrame. You call paintComponent(g) for light-weight containers like a JButton. See if that works.

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