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Given the following code, how does EF/DbContext knows about the change made to the customer object:

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        using(var shopContext = new ShopContext())
        {
            var customer = shopContext.Customers.Find(7);

            customer.City = "Marion";

            customer.State = "Indiana";

            shopContext.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
}

public class ShopContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Customer> Customers { get; set; }
}

public class Customer
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    public string LastName { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
    public string State { get; set; }
}

Thank you

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2  
For new reaaders, this blog post might be helpful: blog.oneunicorn.com/2012/03/10/… –  Karsten Jun 18 '13 at 11:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 24 down vote accepted

When you load the entity from the context it keeps additional data structure - let's call it entry. The entry contains two set of values - original values and current values. When you execute the SaveChanges operation EF goes through your customer entity and updates current values in the entry so that they match with the real state of your entity - this operation is called detecting changes. During SQL command generation EF will compare current and original values and build SQL update statement for to modify changed values in the database.

This operation is called snapshot change tracking - EF keeps snap shot in the entry and updates it. There is alternative called dynamic change tracking which will modify current value in the entry in the same time you assign the value to your entity's property. The dynamic change tracking has specific requirements (like every your property in the entity must be virtual) because it must wrap your class to dynamic proxy at runtime. It used to be preferred way but due to some performance issues in complex scenarios snapshot change tracking is currently supposed to be used as default.

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hi, how does the context knows about the customer object? How does it connected/linked? –  Yair Nevet Apr 30 '12 at 9:53
    
Context knows about it because you retrieved the customer object through the same context instance by calling Customers.Find –  Ladislav Mrnka Apr 30 '12 at 10:11
    
this is a reference? –  Yair Nevet Apr 30 '12 at 11:12
    
@Ladislav: Does your last sentence mean that proxy change tracking is worse in performance than snapshot change tracking in some situations? Do you know examples? I always thought that proxy change tracking is much faster in every situation... –  Slauma Apr 30 '12 at 13:37
1  
@Slauma: Check this article. Arthur is member of EF dev. team and if you check every code first example provided by ADO.NET team or DbContext generator template you will see that change tracking proxies are not default behavior anymore. It appears that performance problems with snapshot change tracking are easier to identify and solve by switching to change tracking proxies. –  Ladislav Mrnka May 1 '12 at 19:06

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