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I am using Ruby on Rails v3.2.2 and I would like to call methods "directly" on instance attributes and not on their receiver objects. That is, if I have an User instance @user for which

@user.name
# => "Leonardo da Vinci"

I would be able to implement methods that act "directly" on the name attribute so that I can write something like

# Note: 'is_correct?' and 'has_char?' are just sample methods.
@user.name.is_correct?
@user.surname.has_char?('V')

Is it possible? If so, how can I make that?

Note: I am trying to implement a plugin.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In order to do this, you would have to use a special type of class for each attribute, which IMHO, would be hugely overkill, assuming your reasons are purely with concern for visual style.

For example, since @user.name returns a String, you can only call methods on it that belong to the String class by default. If you want to call additional methods on it, you either want to use a subclass of String, or add some singleton methods to that particular instance of String. I think it would be confusing and inconsistent and would likely get in the way of real progress.

A better solution is just to ask something like:

@user.valid?(:name)

As for has_char?('V'), you can already do that with instances of String:

@user.surname.include?('V')
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I just played a lil and got it working using singleton methods in a normal class and I'm not sure if it's possible to do the same on your case. I doubt it! But still here is what I got :)

class Bar

  def initialize foo
    @foo = foo
    def @foo.bar 
      p "baaaaaaar"
    end
  end

  def foo
    @foo
  end

  def foo=(foo)
    @foo = foo
    def @foo.bar 
      p "baaaaaaar"
    end
  end
end

a = Bar.new "foo"
p a.foo
p a.foo.bar
a.foo = "bar"
p a.foo.bar
# >> "foo"
# >> "baaaaaaar"
# >> "baaaaaaar"
# >> "baaaaaaar"
# >> "baaaaaaar"
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