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I need to pass achieve section to every pages of my blog. From Google, I end up with creating a context_processor like this

# processor.py 

from myblog.models import Post

def get_date(request):
  return {'dates' : Post.objects.order_by('created')}

this is base.html

<ul>
    {% for d in dates %}
        <li><a href="#">{{ d.created|date:"M-Y"}}</a></li>
    {% endfor %}
</ul>

and this is the TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS

TEMPLATE_CONTEXT_PROCESSORS = (
  "django.contrib.auth.context_processors.auth",
  "django.core.context_processors.debug",
  "django.core.context_processors.i18n",
  "django.core.context_processors.media",
  "django.core.context_processors.static",
  "django.core.context_processors.tz",
  "django.contrib.messages.context_processors.messages",
  'myblog.processor.get_date',
)

Finally, in order to let the date appear on page, i need to pass the RequestContext in every views. This makes me have to repeat the code in every views, but I could use solutions from here to overcome it. However, base on this, it could lead to performance issue.

In the end, what is the optimal solution for this small task in Django ?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most of modern class based views do all job with RequestContext for you so you don't need to worry. If you like old-style function based views - there's a render function.

That "performance issue" is about specific django.core.context_processors.request. As long as you don't use it - everything is fine.

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