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I have some data that I'm querying in a single method. It's gotten to the point where it's become the arrowhead anti-pattern. It looks something like this:

void queryData()
{
    int masterIndex = getMasterIndex();
    if (masterIndex != -1)
    {
        byte[] pageData = getMasterPage(masterIndex);
        if (pageData) != null)
        {
            Item1 i1 = getItem1(pageData);
            Item2 i2 = getItem2(pageData);

            if (i1 != null && i2 != null)
            {
                showResults(i1, i2);
            }
        }
    }
}

Imagine the above but larger. More if statements and each method that is called has a decent amount of logic in it.

Now what I can do is refactor the above method so all if statements are positive and early return if true.

I feel it would be cleaner to break each query and validity check into their own class though. Each action would inherit/implement an interface like the following:

public interface Action
{
    public void run();
    public boolean wasSuccessful();
}

I would create a list of the actions required and run through them one at a time. This way it is obvious to see what logic belongs with each action.

Is this over architected? Is the above an existing pattern I don't know of yet?

Thanks in advance.

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I would not go with separate classes unless you are going to get some really significant benefit of inheritance. The disadvantage of lots of classes is that it's hard to see the big picture. Another refactoring to consider is splitting into multiple methods in the same class. –  Francis Upton Apr 30 '12 at 5:55
    
If you're working with Swing (or might in the future for this project), naming the interface Action is probably not a good idea, since there is a built-in Action interface as part of Swing. –  Adam Mihalcin Apr 30 '12 at 6:29
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Look how much cleaner it is with simply the early returns:

void queryData()
{
    int masterIndex = getMasterIndex();
    if (masterIndex == -1) 
        return;
    byte[] pageData = getMasterPage(masterIndex);
    if (pageData == null)
        return;
    Item1 i1 = getItem1(pageData);
    Item2 i2 = getItem2(pageData);
    if (i1 == null || i2 == null)
        return;
    showResults(i1, i2);
}

I think this is a better approach than creating an additional class structure.

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I've refactored by reversing the ifs as above. It's 90 odd lines long though. I still feel the method is too monolithic. I suppose the next step is breaking the method into multiple sub methods. –  Brad May 1 '12 at 6:15
1  
If it's still too long, then at least this refactoring leaves it in a more "sliceable" state; multiple method extractions may well be the best next step. Alternatively, you could move the method into a new class and make all (or some) of the locals, fields; the methods then extract even easier. –  Carl Manaster May 1 '12 at 13:52
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I would start off by abusing the "Extract Method" function of your IDE (if it has one) and pull out each logic branch into its own method. That way you make the code a lot more readable.

You'll probably want to start off writing a unit test first to make sure the result of your refactoring doesn't break or change the business logic of the code itself. Once you have refactored into smaller methods and are confident that the code still works as originally intended, you can then look at whether you can create classes and extract the code into those.

I wouldn't say that creating classes to have your queries and validity checks would be overengineered, as long as it makes sense and is readable. As you said, you could have a List<Action> and then loop through calling the run() method on each, then check wasSuccessful() on each and output the information as needed.

This way if you ever want to change the validation or query of a given action, you just change the class that the functionality is encapsulated in and you don't have to change your actual execution code.

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