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I myself do not like SO questions with a lot of code but am including it here since this question is about code generation strategy rather than trouble-shooting.

I have switched to EF from my own code generator and having issues with how tightly bound the generated entities are with the ObjectContext. Using the code first approach seems to give you more leverage in that you can throw entity objects around like normal POCO classes without EF having a cow.

Coming from the code generation background, I customized the T4 templates to add some standard implementations to the entity classes that my code expects. Below is an example:

`

public partial class Action:
    Task,
    CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.ICloneable<CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action>,
    CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.IPersistXml<CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action>
{
    #region Constructors, Destructor and Initializers.

    //====================================================================================================
    // Constructors, Destructor and Initializers.
    //====================================================================================================

    public Action ()
    {
        this.InitializeData();
    }

    public void InitializeData ()
    {
        // Native Types.
        this.TemplateId = default(int);

        // Complex Types.

        // Foreign Keys.
        this.Template = new CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Template();

        // Child Objects.
        this.ActionParameters = new System.Collections.Generic.List<CloudTech.ATS.Templates.ActionParameter>();
    }

    #endregion Constructors, Destructor and Initializers.

    #region Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.ICloneable<T>.

    //====================================================================================================
    // Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.ICloneable<T>.
    //====================================================================================================

    public CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action Clone ()
    {
        return (new CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action().CopyFrom(this));
    }

    public CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action CopyFrom (CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action source)
    {
        this.InitializeData();

        // Native Types.
        this.TemplateId = source.TemplateId;

        // Complex Types.

        // Foreign Keys.
        this.Template.CopyFrom(source.Template);

        // Child Objects disabled for XML.
        //this.ActionParameters.CopyFrom(source.ActionParameters);

        return (this);
    }

    public CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action CopyTo (CloudTech.ATS.Templates.Action destination)
    {
        return (destination.CopyFrom(this));
    }

    #endregion Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.ICloneable<T>.

    #region Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.IPersistXml<T>.

    //====================================================================================================
    // Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.IPersistXml<T>.
    //====================================================================================================

    public System.Xml.XmlElement ToXmlElement (System.Xml.XmlDocument document)
    {
        System.Xml.XmlElement element = null;

        element = document.CreateElement(this.GetType().Name);

        // Native Types.
        try { element.Attributes.Append(document, "TemplateId", this.TemplateId.ToString()); }
        catch { element.Attributes.Append(document, "TemplateId", ""); }

        // Complex Types.

        // Foreign Keys.
        element.AppendChild(this.Template.ToXmlElement(document));

        // Child Objects commented for XML.
        //element.AppendChild(this.ActionParameters.ToXmlElement(document));

        return (element);
    }

    public bool FromXmlElement (System.Xml.XmlElement element)
    {
        bool result = true;

        this.InitializeData();

        // Native Types.
        try { this.TemplateId = int.Parse(element.Attributes ["TemplateId"].Value); }
        catch { result = false; }

        // Complex Types.

        // Foreign Keys.
        this.Template.FromXmlElement(element ["Template"]);

        // Child Objects.
        //this.ActionParameters.FromXmlElement(element ["ActionParameters"]);

        return (result);
    }

    #endregion Interface Implementation: CloudTech.ATS.Library.Interfaces.IPersistXml<T>.
}

`

The above is all generated code in addition to the standard entity declarations that EF CF generates of course.

I am now looking to find a way to change the constructor somehow so that my own custom classes can declare a parameter-less constructor and not clash with the one generated. I would rather not have to use a factory method to since Initialize() and InitializeData() is a very old convention with us.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am now looking to find a way to change the constructor somehow so that my own custom classes can declare a parameter-less constructor and not clash with the one generated.

It is not clear what do you mean by that. If you add default constructor to autogenerated class you are done - you cannot do anything else with it. If you don't add it to the class generator you can create second partial part of Action class and default constructor yourselves. If you want to have the default constructor created by the generator and in the same time you want to "modify" what the constructor initializes per entity type you can create partial method called by the constructor.

public partial class Action
{
    public Action()
    {
        Initialize();
    }

    partial void Initialize();
}

Now you can declare second partial part of the Action class and int that new part you can implement Initialize method:

public partial class Action
{
    partial void Initialize()
    {
        // Do something
    }
}

If you don't implement partial method compiler will just remove the call to Initialize from the constructor and it will still work.

share|improve this answer
    
I had no idea methods could be partial as well. That about solves it. What else can be partial? Constructors? –  Raheel Khan Apr 30 '12 at 9:41
    
No constructors cannot be partial. Only methods (implicitly private) which returns void and has no out parameter can be partial. –  Ladislav Mrnka Apr 30 '12 at 10:15
    
Thank you. Although I certainly see a pattern which would go well with your answer, I think I have to revisit the objective. What I am trying to achieve would probably be best addressed by creating a VS extension. Result: Every time I update a class, it should self update the Initialize() method (the one that is not generated). Please understand that this initialization would be for properties and fields that are NOT required in persistence. I should have and will create a question on SO after putting some more effort into the design. In the meanwhile, I will mark your answer as correct. –  Raheel Khan Apr 30 '12 at 17:15

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