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I was given 30 minutes to complete the following task in an interview for an entry level C# developer role, the closest I could get to was to find out if the characters in both sides of the current index matched each other.

Construct an array which takes in an string and determines if at index (i) the substring to

the left of (i) when reversed, equals to the substring to the right of (i).

example: "racecar"

at index(3) the left substring is "rac" and when reversed equals to the right substring "car".

return (i) if met with such condition, eslse return -1. if string length is under 3, return 0;

  if (str.Length < 3)
            return -1;

        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length - 1; i++)
        {
            if(str[i-1] == str [i+1])
               return i;
        }
                return -1;
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9 Answers 9

up vote 0 down vote accepted
 public static int check(string str)
    {
        if(str.Length < 3)
            return 0;

        int n = str.Length;
        int right = str.Length-1;
        int left = 0;

        while (left < right)
        {
            if (str[left] != str[right])
                return -1;

            left++;
            right--;
        }
        return n / 2;
    }
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2  
Note that though it seems to work, it is highly inefficient, it runs in quadric time. –  amit Apr 30 '12 at 7:11
1  
can you post your solution amit? –  user1362208 Apr 30 '12 at 7:13
1  
@Tman: SaeedAmiri's solution is similar to what I have in mind, I don't think posting a new answer will give any additional information. –  amit Apr 30 '12 at 7:16
    
agreed. Its inefficient. There are better solutions here than this one –  bmartins May 2 '12 at 8:21
    
check out my new solution –  Xerxes May 2 '12 at 21:54

If i != n/2 you should return false, so just check for i==n/2:

int n = str.Length;
for (int i=0;i<=n/2;i++)
{
   if (str[i] != str[n-i-1])
     return -1;
}
return n/2;
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2  
str[n-i] -> str[n-1-i] –  amit Apr 30 '12 at 7:12
1  
@amit, Yeah, fixed. –  Saeed Amiri Apr 30 '12 at 7:13
2  
+1 I like how you also answer without using any C# framework / wrapper classes. Think people are missing the point of this sort of questions in a job interview. They don't wanna test your knowledge of a particular language but your logic & problem solving. –  bmartins Apr 30 '12 at 7:43
    
This checks the string is entirely reversible, but the question asks whether the first/last N characters are.... –  Tony D May 2 '12 at 0:03
    
@SaeedAmiri Assume the string is "aa" (so n = 2) and i = 1. In this case it is true that i == n / 2. Two iterations of the for loop will be performed. Both of the iterations will compare "a" to "a", so in the end n/2 (which in this case is 1) will be returned. Is this correct? No. Because the substring to the left of index 1 is "a" and the substring to the right of index 1 is "", so -1 should be returned. So you need to make sure that you change your condition for checking from i == n/2 to i == n/2 && n % 2 == 1 for this algorithm to work. –  Alderath May 2 '12 at 15:13

try this

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string theword = Console.ReadLine();
        char[] arrSplit = theword.ToCharArray();
        bool status = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < arrSplit.Length; i++)
        {
            if (i < theword.Length)
            {
                string leftWord = theword.Substring(0, i);
                char[] arrLeft = leftWord.ToCharArray();
                Array.Reverse(arrLeft);
                leftWord = new string(arrLeft);
                string rightWord = theword.Substring(i + 1, theword.Length - (i + 1));
                if (leftWord == rightWord)
                {
                    status = true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
        Console.Write(status);
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
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I came up with this, but I really hope you were sitting in front of Visual Studio when they asked this...

using System.Linq;

class Program {

    // New version: in fact, we are only looking for palindromes
    // of odd length
    static int FancyQuestion2(string value) {
        if (value.Length % 2 == 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        string reversed = new string(value.ToCharArray().Reverse().ToArray());
        if (reversed.Equals(value,  StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)) {
            return (int)(value.Length / 2);
        }
        return -1;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) {
        int i1 = FancyQuestion2("noon"); // -1 (even length)
        int i2 = FancyQuestion2("racecar"); // 3
        int i3 = FancyQuestion2("WasItACatISaw"); // 6
    }
}
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1  
Same comment as for @xerxes - this solution runs in quadric time –  amit Apr 30 '12 at 7:16
    
@amit: and it's readable, and does what is being asked. –  Paolo Tedesco Apr 30 '12 at 7:17
    
It is just a comment - I think it is improtant issue that should be mentioned in the answer - that's all. I personally believe that low performance solution is better then no solution, but you should be aware of the fact that it is not optimized. –  amit Apr 30 '12 at 7:19
1  
@amit: mine, too, is just a comment - I'm not taking it personally :) I just think that in an interview question of this kind, I would go for this kind of answer, rather than inspecting arrays (and care about performance only if explicitly asked). –  Paolo Tedesco Apr 30 '12 at 7:20
    
Nowhere in the question is it stated that an O(1) solution is desired. –  nikhil Apr 30 '12 at 7:42
  public static bool check(string s, int index)
        {

            if (s.Length < 3)
                return false;

            string left = s.Substring(0, index);
            Char[] rightChars = s.Substring(index + 1).ToCharArray();
            Array.Reverse(rightChars);
                string right =new string (rightChars);
                return left.Equals(right);
        }
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1  
Why you guys using string function, here not reverse requested not original one, just index is important. –  Saeed Amiri Apr 30 '12 at 7:20
    
Saeed, we are avoiding the loop to check for comparison for every char to increase the performance. –  Romil Apr 30 '12 at 7:27
1  
Sure s.Substring(0,index) is slower than comparing n/2 chars, because string is immutable so when you want create substring it will be created newly, both memory assignment and iteration over input will be happens. Also you used linq function: Equals, which means you run comparison like me, but in slower fashion ( because of internal calls linq is slower). Finally I didn't talk about your too many extra function calls. –  Saeed Amiri Apr 30 '12 at 7:34
    
I would say that for most everyday uses, using the String functions would be preferable, since it is more readable, and readability is more important than performance. If the function is performance critical, however, Saeed is absolutely right. Looping and comparing characters will be much quicker than constructing new strings. –  Alderath May 3 '12 at 1:01

Your approach is correct, but the implementation is wrong. You need a different loop variable than i, as that contains the index of the (supposedly) center character in the string.

Also, you can't return the index from inside the loop, then you will only check one pair of character. You have to loop through the string, then check the result.

int checkPalindrome(string str, int i) {
  // check that the index is at the center of the string 
  if (i != str.Length - i - 1) {
    return -1;
  }
  // a variable to keep track of the state
  bool cont = true;
  // loop from 1 until you reach the first and last characters
  for (int j = 1; cont && i - j >= 0; j++) {
    // update the status
    cont &= str[i - j] == str[i + j];
  }
  // check if the status is still true
  if (cont) {
    return i;
  } else {
    return -1;
  }
}
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This is the shortest I can think of:

using System;
public class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {            
        string example = "racecar";
        bool isPal = IsBothEndsPalindrome(example, 3);
        Console.WriteLine(isPal);
    }

    static bool IsBothEndsPalindrome(string s, int i) {
        while(i-- > 0) {
            if(s[i] != s[s.Length - i - 1]) return false;
         }
         return true;
    }
}

How it operates: http://ideone.com/2ae3j

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Another approach, test for -1 upon return, the shortestz I can think of:

using System;
public class Test
{
    public static void Main()
    {       
            TestPal( "Michael", 3 );                
            TestPal( "racecar", 3 );
            TestPal( "xacecar", 3 );
            TestPal( "katutak", 3 );
            TestPal( "able was i ere i saw elba", 7 );
            TestPal( "radar", 2 );
            TestPal( "radars", 2 );
            // This is false, space is not ignored ;-)
            TestPal( "a man a plan a canal panama", 9 );
    }

    static void TestPal(string s, int count) {
        Console.WriteLine( "{0} : {1}", s, IsBothEndsPalindrome(s, count) );
    }

    static bool IsBothEndsPalindrome(string s, int count) {           
        while(--count >= 0 && s[count] == s[s.Length - count - 1]);        
        return count == -1;
    }
}

Output:

Michael : False
racecar : True
xacecar : False
katutak : True
able was i ere i saw elba : True
radar : True
radars : False
a man a plan a canal panama : False

Note: The last one is False, the space is not ignored by code

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Pure C, but hope the workflow helps you getting there. Thanks for sharing this.

int is_palindrome (const char str[], unsigned int index)
{
    int len = strlen(str);
    int result = index;

    //index not valid?
    if (index >= len)
        return -1;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; ((index+i) < len && (index - i) >= 0); ++i) {
        if(str[index-i] != str[index+i])
            return -1;
        else
            continue;
    }

    return result;
}
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