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What are some good patterns for error handling in VBA?

In particular, what should I do in this situation:

... some code ...
... some code where an error might occur ...
... some code ...
... some other code where a different error might occur ...
... some other code ...
... some code that must always be run (like a finally block) ...

I want to handle both errors, and resume execution after the code where the error may occur. Also, the finally code at the end must ALWAYS run - no matter what exceptions are thrown earlier. How can I achieve this outcome?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 44 down vote accepted

Error Handling in VBA


  • On Error Goto ErrorHandlerLabel
  • Resume (Next | ErrorHandlerLabel)
  • On Error Goto 0 (disables current error handler)
  • Err object

The Err object's properties are normally reset to zero or a zero-length string in the error handling routine, but it can also be done explicitly with Err.Clear.

Errors in the error handling routine are terminating.

The range 513-65535 is available for user errors. For custom class errors, you add vbObjectError to the error number.

For not implemented interface members in a derived class, you should use the constant E_NOTIMPL = &H80004001.


Option Explicit

Sub HandleError()
  Dim a As Integer
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    a = 7 / 0
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line won't be executed."

DoCleanUp:
  a = 0
Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
Resume DoCleanUp
End Sub

Sub RaiseAndHandleError()
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    ' The range 513-65535 is available for user errors.
    ' For class errors, you add vbObjectError to the error number.
    Err.Raise vbObjectError + 513, "Module1::Test()", "My custom error."
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line will be executed."

Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
  Err.Clear
Resume Next
End Sub

Sub FailInErrorHandler()
  Dim a As Integer
  On Error GoTo errMyErrorHandler
    a = 7 / 0
  On Error GoTo 0

  Debug.Print "This line won't be executed."

DoCleanUp:
  a = 0
Exit Sub
errMyErrorHandler:
  a = 7 / 0 ' <== Terminating error!
  MsgBox Err.Description, _
    vbExclamation + vbOKCancel, _
    "Error: " & CStr(Err.Number)
Resume DoCleanUp
End Sub

Sub DontDoThis()

  ' Any error will go unnoticed!
  On Error Resume Next
  ' Some complex code that fails here.
End Sub

Sub DoThisIfYouMust()

  On Error Resume Next
  ' Some code that can fail but you don't care.
  On Error GoTo 0

  ' More code here
End Sub
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this is great, but is there a place where all errors are listed So that I can know if mine is preexisting or if I need to create it? –  PsychoData Feb 14 at 18:38
    
@PsychoData, here is a list of the error codes support.microsoft.com/kb/146864 –  Elias Feb 24 at 17:33

I would also add:

  • The global Err object is the closest you have to an exception object
  • You can effectively "throw an exception" with Err.Raise

And just for fun:

  • On Error Resume Next is the devil incarnate and to be avoided, as it silently hides errors
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4  
+1 for warning about On Eror Resume Next. Probably one of the number one reasons why VB programs are generally so full of bugs. –  Makis Jun 24 '09 at 12:50
1  
Not true. When used correctly On Error Resume Next is an equivalent of try/catch. Correct use just requires checking or saving the error status after every line. It does make complex error checking much less verbose. HOWEVER, incorrectly used, all the above applies. –  Ben McIntyre Oct 30 '13 at 6:45
1  
I think everyone would agree that On Error is the equivalent of Try/Catch yes... but On Error Resume Next? It causes all errors to disappear - including the ones we never anticipated. It's better to let errors bleed out than head-scratch for weeks on why something weird is going on [this has happened to me when debugging someone else's code]. I only use it in very special circumstances, tight small functions where an oddity forces you into an error (e.g. does this item exist in a Collection). –  Joel Goodwin Oct 31 '13 at 8:48
2  
If you put too much code in errMyErrorHandler: you risk an error happening in your error handler which creates an endless loop. If you put On Error Resume Next before you process the error in errMyErrorHandler it resets the Err object and you lose the error information. I move my error processing to a sub and pass the err.num and description as parameters so I can then use On Error Resume Next as I reset everything like screenupdating and cursor etc and show the error using the param values... Call mdl_val.usr_sub_handle_error(Err.Source, Err.Description) –  DWiener May 26 at 0:15

So you could do something like this

Function Errorthingy(pParam)
On Error GoTo HandleErr

 ' your code here

    ExitHere:
    ' your finally code
    Exit Function

    HandleErr:
        Select Case Err.Number
        ' different error handling here'
        Case Else
            MsgBox "Error " & Err.Number & ": " & Err.Description, vbCritical, "ErrorThingy"
        End Select


   Resume ExitHere

End Function

If you want to bake in custom exceptions. (e.g. ones that violate business rules) use the example above but use the goto to alter the flow of the method as necessary.

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1  
That's pretty much how we handled errors in a big VB6 application back in the days. Worked relatively well and was easy to use. IIRC, we had an error handling class that was called instead of having the error code in the function. That way it was much easier to change the behaviour as well. –  Makis Jun 24 '09 at 12:52
    
It's generally a good idea to put "On Error GoTo 0" after the block of code where you need error handling. Besides, any error in the error handling code is terminating. –  guillermooo Jun 25 '09 at 7:50

Professional Excel Development has a pretty good error handling scheme. If you're going to spend any time in VBA, it's probably worth getting the book. There are a number of areas where VBA is lacking and this book has good suggestions for managing those areas.

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I think VBA currently only offers the On Error ... instruction for error handling. Detailled article with examples: Error Handling in VBA

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Here's my standard implementation. I like the labels to be self-descriptive.

Public Sub DoSomething()

    On Error GoTo Catch ' Try
    ' normal code here

    Exit Sub
Catch:

    'error code: you can get the specific error by checking Err.Number

End Sub

Or, with a Finally block:

Public Sub DoSomething()

    On Error GoTo Catch ' Try

    ' normal code here

    GoTo Finally
Catch:

    'error code

Finally:

    'cleanup code

End Sub
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If you're looking for a way to "re-throw" errors/exceptions in VBA you could check out the following: Excel VBA: Re-throw errors

Since Visual Basic 6 is no longer supported by Microsoft, VBA will probably soon be depreciated: End of support for VB6

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8  
Not only is this a link drop on a two year old question, but it mentions VB6 which isn't even discussed in the question and also dredges up the incorrect rumor about VBA which has been publicly discredited by Microsoft. –  JimmyPena Nov 18 '11 at 17:24

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