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I have a jsFiddle demonstrating the problem. What happens is that I cannot see the indented list normally if it's wrapped-around an image (which is floated left). I tried adding margin-left: [some value]; but only the list below the image shows the margin (as in visibly). I know the upper list also receives margin but since it's wrapping around, the image sort of serves as its left margin already.

Is there a way around this?

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are you talking abt the text in <p> tags as upper list? –  codef0rmer Apr 30 '12 at 8:06
    
Change the CSS: use ul instead of li –  Sandy Apr 30 '12 at 8:12
    
That cat is adorable –  Martin Jan 11 '13 at 20:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

By adding overflow: auto; to your ul works for me at least.

Update

I've updated my jsfiddle to visualize what's going on. When having the ul beside the floating img, the content of the ul will be pushed by the float, but not the actual container. By adding overflow: auto the whole ul-box will be pushed by the float instead of only the content.

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Why don't you mention why that solves the problem too? :) –  Starx Apr 30 '12 at 8:42
    
Now I've elaborated a bit more why this solves the problem. –  Maehler Apr 30 '12 at 9:48
    
+1, From me, for that :) –  Starx Apr 30 '12 at 11:03
    
Saved my day, thanks :) –  Aurelin Jun 12 '14 at 20:21

Disclaimer

Lists next to floated elements cause issues. In my opinion, the best way to prevent these sorts of floating issues is to avoid floating images that intersect with content. It'll also help when you have to support responsive design.

A simple design of having centered images between paragraphs will look very attractive and be much easier to support than trying to get too fancy. It's also one step away from a <figure>.

But I really want floated images!

Ok, so if you're crazy persistent enough to continue down this path, there are a couple techniques that can be used.

The simplest is to make the list use overflow: hidden or overflow: scroll so that the list is essentially shrink wrapped which pulls the padding back to where it's useful:

img {
  float: left;
}
.wrapping-list {
  overflow: hidden;
  padding-left: 40px;
}
<img src="http://placehold.it/100x100"/>
<ul class="wrapping-list">
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
</ul>

This technique has a few problems though. If the list gets long, it doesn't actually wrap around the image, which pretty much defeats the entire purpose of using float on the image.

img {
  float: left;
}
.wrapping-list {
  overflow: hidden;
  padding-left: 40px;
}
<img src="http://placehold.it/100x100"/>
<ul class="wrapping-list">
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
</ul>

But I really want wrapping lists!

Ok, so if you're even crazier more persistent and you absolutely must continue down this path, there's another technique that can be used to wrap the list items and maintain bullets.

Instead of padding the <ul> and trying to get it to behave nicely with bullets (which it never seems to want to do), take those bullets away from the <ul> and give them to the <li>s. Bullets are dangerous, and the <ul> just isn't responsible enough to handle them properly.

img {
  float: left;
}
.wrapping-list {
  padding: 0;
  list-style-position: inside;
}
.wrapping-list li {
  overflow: hidden;
  padding-left: 25px;
}
<img src="http://placehold.it/100x100"/>
<ul class="wrapping-list">
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
  <li>lorem</li>
  <li>ipsum</li>
  <li>dolor</li>
  <li>sit</li>
  <li>amet</li>
</ul>

This wrapping behavior can do weird things to complex content, so I don't recommend adding it by default. It's much easier to set it up as something that can be opted into rather than something that has to be overridden.

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You could try also floating the ul to the left, and define an appropriate width for it, so that it floats next to the image.

Something a little like this jsfiddle?

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just give the actual width to that image in CSS. Are you trying to achieve this ?

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