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1)Css styles not applied properly to my HTML page,if i add particular version on html like HTML5,HTML4.1 strict,etc.,If i remove all DOCTYPE statements,it works fine.

My HTML code(Display properly without DOCTYPE):

<html> 
<head>
<title>Test</title>
</head>
<body style="background-color:green;height:100%;width:100%;">
<div>My Test page</div>
<div style="background-color:red;height:100%;width:10%;"></div>
</body>
</html>

My HTML code(background color red not applied with DOCTYPE):

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html> 
<head>
<title>Test</title>
</head>
<body style="background-color:green;height:100%;width:100%;">
<div>My Test page</div>
<div style="background-color:red;height:100%;width:10%;"></div>
</body>
</html>

Also, i tried instead of HTML5, XHTML 1.0 strict,

 <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd"> 
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml"> 

and,

  <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">

But not works any one.How to add version properly.

2) Also which is best version now. HTML5 or html4.01 or HTML 4.01 with XHTML?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The problem is that the div is set to 100% of 100% (the body) this makes sence to us but not to the browser. If you set the body position to absolute and set it's top, bottom, left, right to 0, you get the same effect and the div's height setting will work the way you expect. Here's the code.

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html> 
<head>
<title>Test</title>
</head>
<body style="position:absolute;top:0px;left:0px;right:0px;bottom:0px;background-color:green;">
<div>My Test page</div>
<div style="background-color:red;height:100%;width:10%;"></div>
</body>
</html>
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Alternatively, you can set the <html> element's height to 100%. But probably the above is a better way –  Sunday Ironfoot Apr 30 '12 at 8:21
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Lack of a doctype triggers quirks mode, which is meant only for backwards compatibility for "legacy code" that was created before people started using doctypes. It should pretty much never be used; you should always declare a doctype.

Which one to choose?

In this day and age, this is all you need:

<!DOCTYPE html>

You can continue to use XHTML syntax with this doctype if you wish. As far as CSS goes, there aren't any differences I'm aware of with different doctypes, as long as you have one. Doctypes will however change which attributes and elements are valid and in which context. Use the W3C Validator to test your HTML.

Unfortunately, this means you will be rewriting much of your CSS to work in standards mode. I know it sounds like a chore, but you'll just have to bite the bullet and rewrite it.

Important note for moving forward: remove the inline CSS and use an external stylesheet instead, otherwise (among other things) you will find maintenance to be a total nightmare.

Of interest: http://hsivonen.iki.fi/doctype/#choosing

Choosing a Doctype

text/html

In a nutshell: Here are simple guidelines for choosing a doctype for a new text/html document:

Standards mode, cutting edge validation

<!DOCTYPE html>

This is the right thing to do unless you have a specific reason to avoid it. With this doctype, you can validate new features such as <video>, <canvas> and ARIA. Please be sure to test your page in the latest versions of the top browsers. Standards mode, legacy validation target

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

This doctype also triggers the standards mode, but lets you stick to legacy validation in case you want to avoid new features or more precise validation of old features. You’d like to use the Standards mode, but you use sliced images in table layouts and don’t want to fix them

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">

This gives you the Almost Standards mode. Please note that your layouts based on sliced images in tables are likely to break if you later move to HTML5 (and, hence, the full Standards mode). You willfully want the Quirks mode

No doctype.

Please don’t do this. Willfully designing for the Quirks mode will come and haunt you, your coworkers or your successors in the future—when no one even cares about Windows IE 6 anymore (already no one cares about Netscape 4.x and IE 5). Designing for the Quirks mode is a bad idea. Trust me.

If you still want to support Windows IE 6, it is better to apply specific hacks for it using conditional comments than to regress other browsers into the Quirks mode.

I am not recommending any of the XHTML doctypes, because serving XHTML as text/html is considered harmful. If you choose to use an XHTML doctype anyway, please note that the XML declaration makes IE 6 (but not IE 7!) trigger the Quirks mode.

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Regarding "as far as CSS goes, there aren't any differences [..] with different doctypes": stackoverflow.com/questions/6857976/…. The HTML5 heading thing was new to me. –  thirtydot May 3 '12 at 22:42
    
The <section>/heading thing can be dismissed as a case of using the wrong HTML elements for the doctype. The other article lost me at spacer.gif and "table based layouts" and was pretty lengthy so I didn't read it, but I get the gist that these are edge cases. I honestly wasn't sure though, and half-expected a downvote just for posting that line. –  Wesley Murch May 3 '12 at 22:55
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2) It doesn't matter if you take or the old ones. Even google uses and there are no Problems

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