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I created a simple GUI Application with Swing in Scala, and the "Run as Scala Application" in Eclipse works well. I used SBT as build tool, and i created some class files for the application logic + an singleton object in a file with the same name as the object, which has the main() method to start the application.

As I said, simply starting from within eclipse works. But generating a JAR File not (export -> ...). Is there a simple way to do this?

As I have the latest stable scala version, many tips from the internetz seems to be outdated. Even the last comment in this blog

http://garyboone.com/2009/06/creating-single-file-runnable-jars-in-scala-and-eclipse/?wscr=1280x1024

doesn't work. I just want a standalone executable JAR File, which I can share with others without technical knowledge... Any Ideas?

EDIT: I solved the Problem finally. The Problem was that Eclipse shows the Scala Librarys on Build Path, but didn't really export them. May be a Bug, i don't know. Finally, I added scala-library.jar and scala-swing.jar directly to the build path as external jars, ignoring the fact that eclipse shows them as already included -> everything works.

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Do you get an errormessage? Which? If not, what is going wrong exactly? Standalone means what? Runnable with scala yourJar.jar or java yourJar.jar? –  user unknown Apr 30 '12 at 19:20
    
Okay, I have a Java Starterclass exactly like the one in the last comment of the posted link above. Export -> Runnable Jar works, it produces a .jar file. doubleclick: nothing happens. start with java -jar: InvocationTargetException, it seems that scala object is not found. starting the .jar with the scala command works. I doublechecked my buildpath: Scala-Librarie(2.9.2) is in the build path. Any Ideas? It should run when a random user doubleklicks it, he should just need a java runtime. –  Hisako May 1 '12 at 12:33
    
You can accept your own answer. That isn't bad style, since other users with a similar problem might find your question and like to know, if there is an accepted answer. As long as you don't produce questions with that answering pattern in mind, it is absolutly ok - not only that, it is wanted behaviour. –  user unknown May 1 '12 at 21:02
    
Yes, that's the reason for my self-answer. unfortunatly i have to wait several hours until i can accept my answer :) –  Hisako May 2 '12 at 6:41

2 Answers 2

Take a look at retronyms onejar SBT plugin: https://github.com/retronym/sbt-onejar. It seems simple with a good description as well.

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Looks quite interesting, but as I wrote in an other comment here, i really look for a solution to do it from eclipse. –  Hisako May 1 '12 at 12:25
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I found the Solution, see EDIT in the Question. I'll play with the possible alternatives soon, but the eclipse related stuff now works for me. Maybe the guys from Scala IDE could have a look at the packaging of Scala Apps in Eclipse, there were still some hoops to jump through. :)

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I'm not a heavy user of Eclipses build-jar-facility, but I guess it never packs foreign jars into your jar. Very much jars are shared among applications, and you don't want to update them 20 times, nor do you wan't to stay with deprecated jars. –  user unknown May 1 '12 at 21:04
    
I think thats a topic for the folks of the Scala IDE plugin for eclipse :) Seriously, i have to package the scala lib's into the jar to get it running for other users, i personally see no choices (or didn't i get something?). Maybe building a optimized installer which downloads the newest libraries and so on... but in my case, this seems to be overkill. –  Hisako May 2 '12 at 6:39
    
I don't think so. You normally build a jar for the stuff you produced yourself, not for third party libs. When you produce a jar for Java, you don't add jre/lib/rt.jar to your own jar, but expect it to be on the the target machine. You don't add commons.jar (apache) too, but expect the client to organize it himself. –  user unknown May 2 '12 at 8:04
    
I agree in general, but since the common User hasn't installed the scala-libs, I must ship it in my app, right? The goal is a nobrainer-just-click-on-it program :) –  Hisako May 2 '12 at 9:28
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So, to finish this extended discussion here: I totally understand the problem, but since I don't know a better solution for the moment, I'll let everything here as it is. It has disadvantages, but: for know it works. I'll update this when I find a better way, okay? –  Hisako May 2 '12 at 9:58

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