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I'm having a bit of difficulty getting a JavaScript function to execute once and only when a DOM element is fully loaded. I've tried countless combindations of setIntervals, seTimeouts, FOR loops, IF statements, WHILE loops, etc and gotten nowhere.

I did manage to get it to work once, but it's hit-and-miss as I could only get it to work by delaying the function by 2 seconds (which isn't good, as there's no telling exactly how long it takes to load) and rapidly re-firing the same function over and over, which also isn't good.

I just need something to constantly scan the page to tell whether an element exists and has content (innerHTML != undefined, or something), execute a block of code as soon as it is loaded (and only once) and then stop scanning the page.

Has anyone found a way to do this? Also, I need JavaScript, not jQuery.

Thanks.

Original Code

function injectLink_Bridge(){
    setTimeout(function(){
        injectLink();
    }, 2000);
}

function injectLink(){
    var headerElement = document.getElementsByClassName("flex-module-header");

    if (headerElement.innerHTML == undefined) {
        console.log("Element doesn't exist. Restarting function");

        setTimeout(function(){
            injectLink_Bridge(); //I can't remember if the bridge is necessary or not
        }, 2000); 
    } else {
        console.log("Element exists. Injecting");

        setTimeout(function(){
            headerElement[1].innerHTML += "code" //Inject code into the second instance of the class-array
        }, 2000);
    }
}

Finished code

function injectLink(){
    var headerElement = document.getElementsByClassName("flex-module-header")[1]; //Get the second instance

    if(headerElement && headerElement.innerHTML != ""){
        console.log("Element exists and has content. Injecting code...");
        headerElement.innerHTML += "code"; //Currently revising, due to T.J. Crowder's side-note
    } else {
        console.log("Element doesn't exist or has no content. Refiring function...");
        setTimeout(injectLink, 250);
    }
}
share|improve this question
5  
Can you show us your code? –  Mark Walters Apr 30 '12 at 8:36
    
Sorry. I was debating including the code, but it's gone through so many different versions I didn't know if it would help or hinder. I'll include it anyway now. –  mythofechelon Apr 30 '12 at 8:43
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Updated answer after you posted code:

getElementsByClassName returns a NodeList, not an element; NodeList doesn't have an innerHTML property. If you want the second matching element, use [1] to get it, and then test whether you got something back (or if you like you can use .length > 1 to check first, but NodeList is documented as returning null for indexes that don't exist). Also, you don't need a function wrapper around your existing function when passing it to setTimeout. So:

function injectLink(){
    var headerElement = document.getElementsByClassName("flex-module-header")[1];

    if (!headerElement) {
        console.log("Element doesn't exist. Restarting function");

        setTimeout(injectLink, 2000); 
    } else {
        console.log("Element exists. Injecting");

        // Do you really want a further two second delay?
        setTimeout(function(){
            headerElement.innerHTML += "code"; //Inject code into the second instance of the class-array
        }, 2000);
    }
}

Side note: Using .innerHTML += "markup"; is generally not a great way to append content to an element. Here's what the browser does when you do that:

  1. Spins through the element and any descendant elements it has building an HTML string to give to the JavaScript layer.
  2. Tears down all content from the element, which has the by-product of removing any event handlers on descendant elements.
  3. Parses the HTML string and builds new nodes and elements for it.

So a bit of work, and also the possibility of wiping out event handlers. If you're adding a new child element, look at using createElement and appendChild. If you're adding further text content, look at createTextNode and appendChild.


Original answer:

If you give your element an id (although the same concept works regardless of how you're finding the element), you can do this:

(function() {
    setTimeout(check, 0);
    function check() {
        var elm = document.getElementById('theId');
        if (!elm) {
            setTimeout(check, 250); // Check again in a quarter second or so
            return;
        }

        // Use the element
    }
})();

There, we launch our first check almost immediately, and if we don't find the element, we schedule the check again 250ms later. Because we only schedule the next check if the previous one didn't find the element, we only loop as many times as necessary to find the element.

If the element doesn't have an id, presumably you're finding it somehow (querySelector, querySelectorAll, etc.), and so will know whether you found it and will be able to schedule the next check.

Probably worth putting a limit on it, e.g.:

(function() {
    var start = new Date();
    setTimeout(check, 0);
    function check() {
        var elm = document.getElementById('theId');
        if (!elm) {
            if (new Date() - start > 5000) { // More than five seconds
                throw "Couldn't find the element";
            }
            setTimeout(check, 250); // Check again in a quarter second or so
            return;
        }

        // Use the element
    }
})();

...so if you change your HTML and the element doesn't exist anymore, you see an error when testing and are reminded to update your code.

share|improve this answer
    
That's perfect, thank you so much. I was unaware a fair few of the methods you used in the code. Good to know. :) Also, I think the further delay is needed, as the page defines the element before it is filled with content - HTML cannot be injected unless it is delayed, otherwise I get a console error. –  mythofechelon Apr 30 '12 at 9:14
    
@BenHooper: Good deal, glad that helped. BTW, I've added a note about using .innerHTML += "content" which may (or may not) be useful. –  T.J. Crowder Apr 30 '12 at 9:17
    
Ah, yes. That sheds some light as to why other links have stopped working. I'll take a look at the links now. Thanks. :) –  mythofechelon Apr 30 '12 at 9:51
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Edit: now that you've shown your code, there are some problems with it.

For example, getElementsByClassName() returns an array so you can't do this:

var headerElement = document.getElementsByClassName("flex-module-header");
if (headerElement.innerHTML == undefined) 

You would have to do this:

var headerElement = document.getElementsByClassName("flex-module-header");
if (!headerElement || headerElement.length == 0 || headerElement[0].innerHTML == undefined) 

Original answer before code was provided in the question:

If you showed us the whole problem, we could probably come up with something more elegant, but based on what you've told us, all we can suggest now is the blunt force method:

(function() {
    var item, cnt = 0; 
    var pollTimer = setInterval(function() {
        ++cnt;
        if (!item) {
            // cache the item if found so future checks will be faster
            item = document.getElementById("testObject");
        }
        if (item && item.innerHTML != "") {
            // the item has innerHTML now, you can process it
            // with code here
            clearInterval(pollTimer);
        } else {
            if (cnt > 100) {
               // if not found after 100 checks (20 seconds)
               // then stop looking so we don't keep going forever
               clearInterval(pollTimer);
            }
        }
    }, 200);
}){};
share|improve this answer
    
I'll have a read over your answer now, thanks. :) I have included the code now, by the way. –  mythofechelon Apr 30 '12 at 8:52
    
@BenHooper - there are some fundamental problems with how you are using getElementsByClassName() because it returns an array, not a single element. I've commented at the beginning of my answer on that issue. –  jfriend00 Apr 30 '12 at 8:59
    
Thank you for your answer and time, but I gave the answer to T.J. Crowder, as he modified my existing code so that I could understand what I am doing. :) –  mythofechelon Apr 30 '12 at 9:18
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