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I have a column named D1_VAL

The rows in this column have data that looks like this:

C:10
R:200
E:3
N:77

I'm trying to do a search on these values with a logical operator. I've tried this:

SELECT * FROM d1 WHERE CAST(`D1_VAL` AS UNSIGNED) > 5

It doesn't return any rows. I've also tried:

SELECT * FROM d1 WHERE (0 + `D1_VAL`) > 5

How would I do this properly?

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1  
Is it always a one char plus colon in the begin of each string or it can vary? –  zerkms Apr 30 '12 at 9:06
    
@zerkms It's always one char + colon –  Norse Apr 30 '12 at 9:07
2  
You will get much more efficient searching if you break it into two columns and then treat the second column as a proper integral typed column. –  Corbin Apr 30 '12 at 9:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This query will do,

SELECT * FROM d1 WHERE CAST(SUBSTRING(`D1_VAL`, 3) AS UNSIGNED) > 5

But its better to normalize the values like C:10 to two separate columns.

create table d1(
    letter char(1),
    number int,
    // ... other columns
)
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What is the comparison you are trying to do?

If compare the number (on the righ to colon) against 5, try something like this:

CAST(SUBSTRING(`D1_VAL`, INSTR(`D1_VAL`, `:`)) AS UNSIGNED) > 5 

For more information on string functions, see here.

Also, I would suggest having a think about the database design - i.e. would the contents of this column be better off being stored in two columns - e.g. a char and an integer? That would be more efficient - requiring less disk space and allowing faster queries. If you have lots of rows, doing various string functions, casting etc. could make your queries run quite slowly.

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