Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good morning,

i need to obtain the value of the CPUs high-resolution performance counter in order to measure delay between various software applications. In my c(++|#) i use the

BOOL WINAPI QueryPerformanceCounter( __out LARGE_INTEGER *lpPerformanceCount );

WinApi call. What is the proper way to obtain the counter from java. I have search jna without success. I know this is a platform specific issue, but maybe there is a quicker way than writing my own jni wrapper?

Best wishes, Armin

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

How about using System.nanoTime? I think that already uses the performance counters of the machine and there is no need to write a native wrapper.

Update: According to this article on clocks and timers in the jvm in the section "Clocks and Timers on Windows"

System.nanoTime() is implemented using the QueryPerformanceCounter/QueryPerformanceFrequency API

share|improve this answer
1  
Jörn, nanoTime() returns the time, rather than the uncooked performance counter. Since i want to measure delay between different applications i need the performance counter value rather than a transform. –  armin o Apr 30 '12 at 10:59
    
nanoTime returns counter, not time. Read javadoc. –  Stas Jul 5 '12 at 10:14
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is the native wrapper code

1) File W32Call.java

package jmSense.Native; public class W32Call {
public native static long QueryPerformanceCounter( );
public native static int QueryPerformanceCounterInt32( );

2) run java h to create the include file

3) Create a dll "My Native Extensions.dll" from

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "windows.h"
#include "jmSense_Native_W32Call.h" 

JNIEXPORT jlong JNICALL Java_jmSense_Native_W32Call_QueryPerformanceCounter(JNIEnv *, jclass)
{  
    LARGE_INTEGER g_CurentCount; 
    QueryPerformanceCounter((LARGE_INTEGER*)&g_CurentCount); 
    return g_CurentCount.QuadPart; 
}

JNIEXPORT jint JNICALL Java_jmSense_Native_W32Call_QueryPerformanceCounterInt32(JNIEnv *, jclass)
{  
     LARGE_INTEGER g_CurentCount; 
     QueryPerformanceCounter((LARGE_INTEGER*)&g_CurentCount); 
     return g_CurentCount.LowPart;
}

4) Use it like this:

System.loadLibrary("My Native Extensions");
System.out.println(W32Call.QueryPerformanceCounter());

fine

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you do all that? QueryPerformanceCounter is used by System.nanoTime anyway. Just use System.nanoTime. –  Stas Jul 5 '12 at 10:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.