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I have got a problem with Java serialization. Suppose I had one Object persisted to file system. How can we update the structure of the files according to object structure modification in latter version?

For example if I saved Object

A{int a; String b} to file

And I changed a structure to A{int a; String b, char c} is there any way I can change previous saved files according to latter version of A?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's possible. You'll need to make the next version backward-compatible with the previous version. The ways to do that are explained in the Java serialization specification: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.3/docs/guide/serialization/spec/version.doc.html.

This problem, however, is a good example of why using the native Java serialization to persist objects for a long time is usually a bad idea. If you had used a specific format (XML, JSON or whatever), you could easily read and transform the files themselves, or be able to read any version of the file with different implementation of the serializer, and thus migrate more easily from one version to another.

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Persisting Objects in XML would significantly increase file size but nature serialization does have this inflexibility... thanks for your help. it seems not a easy way to balance these two issues. –  Korben Apr 30 '12 at 15:35

Yes (as long as the structure isn't too different and obeys certain rules). Let's say that your file contains the serialised representation of:

class Foo
{
  int a;                        // value = 42
  String b;                     // value = "don't panic"
}

However, you've now changed your Foo object, and the class definition is now:

class Foo
{
   int a;
   String b;
   char c;
}

When read in your file, the serialisation mechanism will automagically pop an instance of Foo into existance, and set a to 42 and b to "don't panic". A value for c was not in the stream, so, by default, it gets set to the Java default value (in this case, for a char, 0x0000).

Now you have your object, you might set the value for c:

foo.c = 'Z';

If you now serialise your object and write it to the file, the file will have the serialised representation of:

class Foo
{
  int a;                        // value = 42
  String b;                     // value = "don't panic"
  char c;                       // value = 'Z'
}

As we saw above, c got given a default value when it wasn't found in the object stream. You might want to define a different default value. The serialisation mechanism provides a way for you to execute custom code when serialising/deserialising. Take a look at the Javadoc for Serializable for details (see the description of readObject()).


Edit: As JB Nizet points out, there is a special serialisation field called serialVersionUID. You need to ensure that the version ID in your object matches what's in the object stream. You can set it explicitly in your object like this:

private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

However, if you didn't specify it originally, it got written out automatically using a value algorithmically generated from a hash of the fields and method signatures. If you need to re-generate this number (so you can define it as a constant in your class, you'll need to use the serialver tool.

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No, it will lead to an exception, because the computed serialVersionUID of the new class won't be the same as the one stored in the file generated from the previous class. You'll need to add a serialVersionUID static field to the new class, which has the same value as the previous one. –  JB Nizet Apr 30 '12 at 10:52
    
@JBNizet: Indeed you will need to define serialVersionUID. Let me see if I can't work that in there ... –  Greg Kopff Apr 30 '12 at 10:57

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