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This code reads the number of lines to process from the first line of stdin, then it loops number_of_lines_to_process times doing some calculations and prints the result. I want it to print the line number in "Line #" after "#" but I don't know how to obtain it

import IO
import Control.Monad (replicateM)

main :: IO ()

main = do
    hSetBuffering stdin LineBuffering
    s <- getLine
    let number_of_lines_to_process = read s :: Integer
    lines <- replicateM (fromIntegral(number_of_lines_to_process)) $ do
        line <- getLine
        let number = read line :: Integer
            result = number*2 --example
        putStrLn ("Line #"++": "++(show result)) --I want to print the number of the iteration and the result
    return ()

I guess that the solution to this problem is really easy, but I'm not familiar with Haskell (coding in it for the first time) and I didn't find any way of doing this. Can anyone help?

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Preparing for Google Code Jam? :) –  Rotsor Apr 30 '12 at 14:46
    
@Rotsor Nope, but close. I'm currently on another programming competition :) –  ICTylor Apr 30 '12 at 16:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You could use forM_ instead of replicateM:

import IO
import Control.Monad

main :: IO ()
main = do
    hSetBuffering stdin LineBuffering
    s <- getLine
    let number_of_lines_to_process = read s :: Integer

    forM_ [1..number_of_lines_to_process] (\i -> do
        line <- getLine
        let number = read line :: Integer
            result = number * 2
        putStrLn $ "Line #" ++ show i ++ ": " ++ show result)

Note that because you use forM_ (which discards the results of each iteration) you don't need the additional return () at the end - the do block returns the value of the last statement, which in this case is the () which is returned by forM_.

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Thanks for the answer! –  ICTylor Apr 30 '12 at 11:36
3  
No problem. Aside: I'd be interested to know why this was downvoted. –  Chris Taylor Apr 30 '12 at 12:10

The trick is to first create a list of all the line numbers you want to print, and to then loop through that list, printing each number in turn. So, like this:

import Control.Monad

import System.IO

main :: IO ()
main = do
  hSetBuffering stdin LineBuffering
  s <- getLine
  let lineCount = read s :: Int
      -- Create a list of the line numbers
      lineNumbers = [1..lineCount]

  -- `forM_` is like a "for-loop"; it takes each element in a list and performs
  -- an action function that takes the element as a parameter
  forM_ lineNumbers $ \ lineNumber -> do
    line <- getLine
    let number = read line :: Integer
        result = number*2 --example
    putStrLn $ "Line #" ++ show lineNumber ++ ": " ++ show result
  return ()

Read the definition of forM_.

By the way, I wouldn't recommend using the old Haskell98 IO library. Use System.IO instead.

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Thanks for the answer! –  ICTylor Apr 30 '12 at 11:37

You could calculate the results, enumerate them, and then print them:

import IO
import Control.Monad (replicateM)

-- I'm assuming you start counting from zero
enumerate xs = zip [0..] xs

main :: IO ()

main = do
    hSetBuffering stdin LineBuffering
    s <- getLine
    let number_of_lines_to_process = read s :: Integer
    lines <- replicateM (fromIntegral(number_of_lines_to_process)) $ do
        line <- getLine
        let number = read line :: Integer
            result = number*2 --example
        return result
    mapM_ putStrLn [ "Line "++show i++": "++show l | (i,l) <- enumerate lines ]
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Thanks for the answer! –  ICTylor Apr 30 '12 at 11:38

I'm still new at Haskell, so there could be problems with the program below (it does work). This program is a tail recursive implementation. The doLine helper function carries around the line number. The processing step is factored into process, which you can change according to the problem you are presented.

import System.IO
import Text.Printf

main = do
  hSetBuffering stdin LineBuffering
  s <- getLine
  let number_of_lines_to_process = read s :: Integer
  processLines number_of_lines_to_process
  return ()

-- This reads "max" lines from stdin, processing each line and
-- printing the result.
processLines :: Integer -> IO ()
processLines max = doLine 0
    where doLine i
              | i == max = return ()
              | otherwise =
                  do
                    line <- getLine
                    let result = process line
                    Text.Printf.printf "Line #%d: %d\n" (i + 1) result
                    doLine (i + 1)


-- Just an example. (This doubles the input.)
process :: [Char] -> Integer
process line = let number = read line :: Integer
               in
                 number * 2

I'm a haskell rookie, so any critiques of the above are welcome.

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You don't have to use the i variable in your code; just decrement the max variable on each iteration and check whether it is 0. You can also use pattern matching and where-clauses in some places instead of if..then..else-expressions and let..in expressions. –  dflemstr Apr 30 '12 at 16:15
    
@dflemstr: If I don't have i, how will I print the line number? –  bstpierre Apr 30 '12 at 16:18
    
My only quibble is your claim that "no monads are needed". You are using the IO monad all over the place (the hint is the word do, which is syntactic sugar for the chaining together of monadic functions with the >>= and >> operators). –  Chris Taylor Apr 30 '12 at 16:35
    
@bstpierre, good point. However, using forM_ will remove that issue altogether, and I personally think that it's a "cleaner" solution. –  dflemstr Apr 30 '12 at 16:38
    
@ChrisTaylor: True; I was referring to iteration, not IO, which obviously needs the monads. –  bstpierre Apr 30 '12 at 16:42

Just as an alternative, I thought that you might enjoy an answer with minimal monad mucking and no do notation. We zip a lazy list of the user's data with an infinite list of the line number using the enumerate function to give us our desired output.

import System.IO
import Control.Monad (liftM)

--Here's the function that does what you really want with the data
example = (* 2)

--Enumerate takes a function, a line number, and a line of input and returns
--an ennumerated line number of the function performed on the data
enumerate :: (Show a, Show b, Read a) => (a->b) -> Integer -> String -> String
enumerate f i x = "Line #" ++ 
                  show i ++ 
                  ": " ++ 
                  (show . f . read $ x) -- show . f . read handles our string conversion

-- Runover takes a list of lines and runs 
-- an enumerated version of the sample over those lines.
-- The first line is the number of lines to process.
runOver :: [String] -> [String]
runOver (line:lines) = take (read line) $ --We only want to process the number of lines given in the first line
                       zipWith (enumerate example) [1..] lines -- run the enumerated example 
                                                               -- over the list of numbers and the list of lines

-- In our main, we'll use liftM to lift our functions into the IO Monad
main = liftM (runOver . lines) getContents
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