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Warning! Spoilers ahead!

You are given the following information, but you may prefer to do some research for yourself.

1 Jan 1900 was a Monday. Thirty days has September, April, June and November. All the rest have thirty-one, Saving February alone, Which has twenty-eight, rain or shine. And on leap years, twenty-nine.

A leap year occurs on any year evenly divisible by 4, but not on a century unless it is divisible by 400. How many Sundays fell on the first of the month during the twentieth century (1 Jan 1901 to 31 Dec 2000)?

At first, it seems like a simple problem. However, as I coded the solution, I ran into an odd problem - the answer should, in fact, be 171, but I get 173, whatever I do. I've looked over and over again my code, but nevertheless cannot find the bug.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main () {

    int count = 0, days_in_month, days_passed = 1;

    for (int i = 1900; i <= 2000; i++) {
        for (int j = 1; j <= 12; j++) {
            if (j == 4 || j == 6 || j == 9 || j == 11) {
                days_in_month = 30;
            } else if (j == 2) {
                if (i % 400 == 0 || (i % 4 == 0 && i % 100 != 0)) {
                    days_in_month = 29;
                } else {
                    days_in_month = 28;
                }
            } else {
                days_in_month = 31;
            }
            if (days_passed % 7 == 0) {
                count++;
            }
            days_passed += days_in_month;
        }
    }

    cout << count << endl;

    cin.ignore();
    return 0;

}

Can anyone notice anything wrong with my code?

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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Mitch Wheat, Luc Touraille, Daniel Fischer, Graviton May 1 '12 at 1:38

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
Don't just look at your code, step through it line by line with the debugger. At some point, its behaviour must diverge from what you expect. –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 10:59
    
What I did was cout all the data and see if the weekdays matched at the end of the loops, too. They did. That's what's bugging me. –  wolx Apr 30 '12 at 11:00
7  
Read the description again. Especially the definition of "twentieth century". –  Henrik Apr 30 '12 at 11:00
    
Ah, now I feel stupid again. Thank you! –  wolx Apr 30 '12 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You are starting from 1900 i = 1900. The problem says "1 Jan 1901".

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