Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Given the following:

declare @a table
(
    pkid int,
    value int
)

declare @b table
(
    otherID int,
    value int
)


insert into @a values (1, 1000)
insert into @a values (1, 1001)
insert into @a values (2, 1000)
insert into @a values (2, 1001)
insert into @a values (2, 1002)

insert into @b values (-1, 1000)
insert into @b values (-1, 1001)
insert into @b values (-1, 1002)

How do I query for all the values in @a that completely match up with @b?

{@a.pkid = 1, @b.otherID = -1} would not be returned (only 2 of 3 values match)

{@a.pkid = 2, @b.otherID = -1} would be returned (3 of 3 values match)

Refactoring tables can be an option.

EDIT: I've had success with the answers from James and Tom H.

When I add another case in @b, they fall a little short.

insert into @b values (-2, 1000)

Assuming this should return two additional rows ({@a.pkid = 1, @b.otherID = -2} and {@a.pkid = 2, @b.otherID = -2}, it doesn't work. However, for my project this is not an issue.

share|improve this question
    
I modified mine to account for duplicates –  James Sep 19 '08 at 18:16

12 Answers 12

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Probably not the cheapest way to do it:

SELECT a.pkId,b.otherId FROM
	(SELECT a.pkId,CHECKSUM_AGG(DISTINCT a.value) as 'ValueHash' FROM @a a GROUP BY a.pkId) a
	INNER JOIN (SELECT b.otherId,CHECKSUM_AGG(DISTINCT b.value) as 'ValueHash' FROM @b b GROUP BY b.otherId) b
ON a.ValueHash = b.ValueHash

You can see, basically I'm creating a new result set for each representing one value for each Id's set of values in each table and joining only where they match.

share|improve this answer
    
I must say that your solution is an interesting approach. I'm not sure I would rely on a hash value without using some other method of double checking. But anyway it is very interesting to read so I just wanted to say it's cool. –  Cervo Sep 19 '08 at 17:56
    
I thought this was pretty slick solution so I had to add my vote. –  Quintin Robinson Sep 19 '08 at 17:59
    
Thanks. Yea, I'd be kinda leery about relying on just a single hash value if there are large amounts of data. You could gain a lot of confidence without doubling the expense by doing a second hash after appending some fixed value to each of the a and b values. Like CHECKSUM_AGG(a.value + 'aaa') –  James Sep 19 '08 at 17:59
    
I take that back...doing so would almost double the expense, I think. –  James Sep 19 '08 at 18:06

This is more efficient (it uses TOP 1 instead of COUNT), and works with (-2, 1000):

SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  ab.pkid, ab.otherID,
                (
                SELECT  TOP 1 COALESCE(ai.value, bi.value)
                FROM    (
                        SELECT  *
                        FROM    @a aii
                        WHERE   aii.pkid = ab.pkid
                        ) ai
                FULL OUTER JOIN
                        (
                        SELECT  *
                        FROM    @b bii
                        WHERE   bii.otherID = ab.otherID
                        ) bi
                ON      ai.value = bi.value
                WHERE   ai.pkid IS NULL OR bi.otherID IS NULL
                ) unmatch
        FROM
                (
                SELECT  DISTINCT pkid, otherid
                FROM    @a a , @b b
                ) ab
        ) q
WHERE   unmatch IS NOT NULL
share|improve this answer
    
I've run on similar problem, and decided to use your solution instead of James' (I think his solution is good but slick). +1 for you. –  rafek Jun 22 '09 at 11:40

The following query gives you the requested results:

select A.pkid, B.otherId
    from @a A, @b B 
    where A.value = B.value
    group by A.pkid, B.otherId
    having count(B.value) = (
    	select count(*) from @b BB where B.otherId = BB.otherId)
share|improve this answer

Works for your example, and I think it will work for all cases, but I haven't tested it thoroughly:

SELECT
    SQ1.pkid
FROM
    (
    	SELECT
    		a.pkid, COUNT(*) AS cnt
    	FROM
    		@a AS a
    	GROUP BY
    		a.pkid
    ) SQ1
INNER JOIN
    (
    	SELECT
    		a1.pkid, b1.otherID, COUNT(*) AS cnt
    	FROM
    		@a AS a1
    	INNER JOIN @b AS b1 ON b1.value = a1.value
    	GROUP BY
    		a1.pkid, b1.otherID
    ) SQ2 ON
    	SQ2.pkid = SQ1.pkid AND
    	SQ2.cnt = SQ1.cnt
INNER JOIN
    (
    	SELECT
    		b2.otherID, COUNT(*) AS cnt
    	FROM
    		@b AS b2
    	GROUP BY
    		b2.otherID
    ) SQ3 ON
    	SQ3.otherID = SQ2.otherID AND
    	SQ3.cnt = SQ1.cnt
share|improve this answer
-- Note, only works as long as no duplicate values are allowed in either table
DECLARE @validcomparisons TABLE (
    pkid	INT,
    otherid	INT,
    num	INT
)

INSERT INTO @validcomparisons (pkid, otherid, num)
SELECT  a.pkid, b.otherid, A.cnt
FROM    (select pkid, count(*) as cnt FROM @a group by pkid) a
INNER JOIN  (select otherid, count(*) as cnt from @b group by otherid) b 
    ON	b.cnt = a.cnt

DECLARE @comparison TABLE (
    pkid	INT,
    otherid	INT,
    same	INT)

insert into @comparison(pkid, otherid, same)
SELECT a.pkid, b.otherid, count(*)
FROM    @a a
INNER JOIN  @b b
    ON	a.value = b.value
GROUP BY    a.pkid, b.otherid

SELECT  COMP.PKID, COMP.OTHERID
FROM    @comparison comp
INNER JOIN  @validcomparisons val
    ON	comp.pkid = val.pkid
    AND	comp.otherid = val.otherid
    AND	comp.same = val.num
share|improve this answer

I've added a few extra test cases. You can change your duplicate handling by changing the way you use distinct keywords in your aggregates. Basically, I'm getting a count of matches and comparing it to a count of required matches in each @a and @b.

declare @a table
(
    pkid int,
    value int
)

declare @b table
(
    otherID int,
    value int
)


insert into @a values (1, 1000)
insert into @a values (1, 1001)

insert into @a values (2, 1000)
insert into @a values (2, 1001)
insert into @a values (2, 1002)

insert into @a values (3, 1000)
insert into @a values (3, 1001)
insert into @a values (3, 1001)

insert into @a values (4, 1000)
insert into @a values (4, 1000)
insert into @a values (4, 1001)


insert into @b values (-1, 1000)
insert into @b values (-1, 1001)
insert into @b values (-1, 1002)

insert into @b values (-2, 1001)
insert into @b values (-2, 1002)

insert into @b values (-3, 1000)
insert into @b values (-3, 1001)
insert into @b values (-3, 1001)



SELECT Matches.pkid, Matches.otherId
FROM
(
    SELECT a.pkid, b.otherId, n = COUNT(*)
    FROM @a a
    INNER JOIN @b b
    	ON a.Value = b.Value
    GROUP BY a.pkid, b.otherId
) AS Matches

INNER JOIN 
(
    SELECT
    	pkid,
    	n = COUNT(DISTINCT value)
    FROM @a
    GROUP BY pkid
) AS ACount
ON Matches.pkid = ACount.pkid

INNER JOIN
(
    SELECT
    	otherId,
    	n = COUNT(DISTINCT value)
    FROM @b
    GROUP BY otherId
) AS BCount
    ON Matches.otherId = BCount.otherId

WHERE Matches.n = ACount.n AND Matches.n = BCount.n
share|improve this answer

How do I query for all the values in @a that completely match up with @b?

I'm afraid this definition is not quite perfectly clear. It seems from your additional example that you want all pairs of a.pkid, b.otherID for which every b.value for the given b.otherID is also an a.value for the given a.pkid.

In other words, you want the pkids in @a that have at least all the values for otherIDs in b. Extra values in @a appear to be okay. Again, this is reasoning based on your additional example, and the assumption that (1, -2) and (2, -2) would be valid results. In both of those cases, the a.value values for the given pkid are more than the b.value values for the given otherID.

So, with that in mind:

    select
    matches.pkid
    ,matches.otherID
from
(
    select 
    	a.pkid
    	,b.otherID
    	,count(1) as cnt
    from @a a
    inner join @b b
    	on b.value = a.value
    group by 
    	a.pkid
    	,b.otherID
) as matches
inner join
(
    select
    	otherID
    	,count(1) as cnt
    from @b
    group by otherID
) as b_counts
on b_counts.otherID = matches.otherID
where matches.cnt = b_counts.cnt
share|improve this answer

Several ways of doing this, but a simple one is to create a union view as

create view qryMyUinion as select * from table1 union all select * from table2

be careful to use union all, not a simple union as that will omit the duplicates

then do this

select count( * ), [field list here] from qryMyUnion group by [field list here] having count( * ) > 1

the Union and Having statements tend to be the most overlooked part of standard SQL, but they can solve a lot of tricky issues that otherwise require procedural code

share|improve this answer
    
Can you post some code that shows this? –  Austin Salonen Sep 19 '08 at 17:37

To iterate the point further:

select a.*
from @a a 
inner join @b b on a.value = b.value

This will return all the values in @a that match @b

share|improve this answer

If you are trying to return only complete sets of records, you could try this. I would definitely recommend using meaningful aliases, though ...

Cervo is right, we need an additional check to ensure that a is an exact match of b and not a superset of b. This is more of an unwieldy solution at this point, so this would only be reasonable in contexts where analytical functions in the other solutions do not work.

select 
	a.pkid,
	a.value
from
	@a a
where
	a.pkid in
	(
	select
		pkid
	from
		(
		select 
			c.pkid,
			c.otherid,
			count(*) matching_count
		from 
			(
			select 
				a.pkid,
				a.value,
				b.otherid
			from 
				@a a inner join @b b 
				on a.value = b.value
			) c
		group by 
			c.pkid,
			c.otherid
		) d
		inner join
		(
		select 
			b.otherid,
			count(*) b_record_count
		from
			@b b
		group by
			b.otherid
		) e
		on d.otherid = e.otherid
		and d.matching_count = e.b_record_count
		inner join
		(
		select 
			a.pkid match_pkid,
			count(*) a_record_count
		from
			@a a
		group by
			a.pkid
		) f
		on d.pkid = f.match_pkid
		and d.matching_count = f.a_record_count
	)
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this works. I took your code and cut and pasted it with the code above and added the line insert into @a values (2, 1003). The problem is you don't check the count in @a as well. So if B matches with everything in A you say it is correct. This ignores A having more entries than b. –  Cervo Sep 19 '08 at 18:15

1) i assume that you don't have duplicate id

2) get the key with the same number of value

3) the row with the number of key value equal to the number of equal value is the target

I hope it's what you searched for (you don't search performance don't you ?)

declare @a table( pkid int, value int) declare @b table( otherID int, value int)

insert into @a values (1, 1000)

insert into @a values (1, 1001)

insert into @a values (2, 1000)

insert into @a values (2, 1001)

insert into @a values (2, 1002)

insert into @a values (3, 1000)

insert into @a values (3, 1001)

insert into @a values (4, 1000)

insert into @a values (4, 1001)

insert into @b values (-1, 1000)

insert into @b values (-1, 1001)

insert into @b values (-1, 1002)

insert into @b values (-2, 1001)

insert into @b values (-2, 1002)

insert into @b values (-3, 1000)

insert into @b values (-3, 1001)

select cntok.cntid1 as cntid1, cntok.cntid2 as cntid2

  from
 (select cnt.cnt, cnt.cntid1, cnt.cntid2 from
    (select acnt.cnt as cnt, acnt.cntid as cntid1, bcnt.cntid as cntid2 from
          (select count(pkid) as cnt, pkid as cntid from @a group by pkid)
           as acnt
                full join 
               (select count(otherID) as cnt, otherID as cntid from @b group by otherID)
                as bcnt
                   on  acnt.cnt = bcnt.cnt)
     as cnt
     where cntid1 is not null and cntid2 is not null)
   as cntok 
inner join 
(select count(1) as cnt, cnta.cntid1 as cntid1, cnta.cntid2 as cntid2
from
    (select cnt, cntid1, cntid2, a.value as value1 
     from
         (select cnt.cnt, cnt.cntid1, cnt.cntid2 from
            (select acnt.cnt as cnt, acnt.cntid as cntid1, bcnt.cntid as cntid2 from
                  (select count(pkid) as cnt, pkid as cntid from @a group by pkid)
                   as acnt
                        full join 
                       (select count(otherID) as cnt, otherID as cntid from @b group by otherID)
                        as bcnt
                           on  acnt.cnt = bcnt.cnt)
             as cnt
             where cntid1 is not null and cntid2 is not null)
         as cntok 
             inner join @a as a on a.pkid = cntok.cntid1)
      as cnta
         inner join

             (select cnt, cntid1, cntid2, b.value as value2 
             from
             (select cnt.cnt, cnt.cntid1, cnt.cntid2 from
                    (select acnt.cnt as cnt, acnt.cntid as cntid1, bcnt.cntid as cntid2 from
                          (select count(pkid) as cnt, pkid as cntid from @a group by pkid)
                           as acnt
                                full join 
                               (select count(otherID) as cnt, otherID as cntid from @b group by otherID)
                                as bcnt
                                   on  acnt.cnt = bcnt.cnt)
                     as cnt
                     where cntid1 is not null and cntid2 is not null)
                 as cntok 
                     inner join @b as b on b.otherid = cntok.cntid2)
               as cntb
               on cnta.cntid1 = cntb.cntid1 and cnta.cntid2 = cntb.cntid2 and cnta.value1 = cntb.value2
      group by cnta.cntid1, cnta.cntid2) 
   as cntequals
   on cntok.cnt = cntequals.cnt and cntok.cntid1 = cntequals.cntid1 and cntok.cntid2 = cntequals.cntid2
share|improve this answer

As CQ says, a simple inner join is all you need.

Select * -- all columns but only from #a
from #a 
inner join #b 
on #a.value = #b.value -- only return matching rows
where #a.pkid  = 2
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.