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I am working on a project with ASP.Net MVC3 EF4.1 and relationships between tables through foreign keys. I am using the database first approach and have three tables: Calendar, Calendar Users and Users. The relationship is that a Calendar can have many users and users can have many calendars.

When someone is creating the calendar he/she is also supposed to select the number of users that will have access to the calendar. But now when I am about to save the changes to the database in the controller thats when I get confused. In the generated classes there are also virtual ICollections that I suppose represent the foreign keys somehow. But I can't figure out how I am supposed to handle them? So how is it supposed to work? Should I be able to add the changes to the virtual ICollections and then just do db.SaveChanges() and it will work by itself or am I supposed too handle that manually?

If I am supposed to handle it manually should I then add the users, add the calendar and then add the keys in the CalendarUsers table to bind them together? I've seen some examples from code first where they have clarified the relationship by entering code in the OnModelCreating method but when using Database first it just contains: throw new UnintentionalCodeFirstException();? Hoping you perhaps can clarify it for me a bit.

Added the classes generated by the DBcontext Generator below:

public partial class Calendar
{
    public Calendar()
    {
        this.CalendarUsers = new HashSet<CalendarUser>();
    }

    public int CalendarId { get; set; }
    public string CalendarTitle { get; set; }
    public string CalendarDescription { get; set; }
    public long UserId { get; set; }

    public virtual User User { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<CalendarUser> CalendarUsers { get; set; }
}

public partial class CalendarUser
{
    public int CalendarUserId { get; set; }
    public int CalendarId { get; set; }
    public long UserId { get; set; }
    public Nullable<bool> IsAdmin { get; set; }

    public virtual Calendar Calendar { get; set; }
    public virtual User User { get; set; }
}

public partial class User
{
    public User()
    {
        this.Calendars = new HashSet<Calendar>();
        this.CalendarUsers = new HashSet<CalendarUser>();
    }

    public long UserId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }

    public virtual ICollection<Calendar> Calendars { get; set; }
    public virtual ICollection<CalendarUser> CalendarUsers { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question
    
Can you show the created classes? (Not all details, just the properties that refer between the classes and the key and foreign key properties.) Important question is also if you have a separate class for CalendarUsers or if it is only a (many-to-many join) table without a class in the model. –  Slauma Apr 30 '12 at 13:23
    
CalendarUsers is a separate class. Maybe thats not a good approach? –  Janspeed May 3 '12 at 6:58
    
The CalendarUser class is OK, you need it because of the IsAdmin flag. More confusing is the additional one-to-many relationship between Calendar.User and User.Calendars. Why do you have this? You said the relation is many-to-many and that's also in the model (Calendar.CalendarUsers and User.CalendarUsers). But what is the purpose of this additional one-to-many relationship? –  Slauma May 3 '12 at 10:51
    
Now I could imagine an interpretation: Is Calendar.User supposed to be the user who is the Admin for that calendar? Or can more than one user be Admins for a specific calendar? –  Slauma May 3 '12 at 11:09
    
The user ID associated with the calendar is the calendar owner. Several users will be able to be admin of the calendar and those are listed in CalendarUser but only one will be the owner of a Calendar. But the question remains. Do I save all the entries manually or is there some relation magic that I am supposed to use but haven't gotten working yet? Or is this a limitation to the Database first approach and I should change to code first? –  Janspeed May 3 '12 at 12:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can just create a new relationship between existing Calendar and User by setting the foreign key properties in a new instance of the CalendarUser:

var newCalendarUser = new CalendarUser
{
    CalendarId = calendarId,
    UserId = userId,
    IsAdmin = true // or false
};
dbContext.CalendarUsers.Add(newCalendarUser);
dbContext.SaveChanges();
share|improve this answer
    
When I try to add a new CalendarUser it just says that I don't have an empty constructor in the class. I could add such a constructor but each time I update my models I would have to remake the constructor. Thats why I'm thinking that I have missed something? Also I wonder if that is really how its meant to be done? Cause then I would have to keep track of all the relationships myself and all the coding that follows? What is the purpose of the public virtual ICollection<CalendarUser> then? Sorry for asking so many questions. I really appreciate the effort. –  Janspeed May 4 '12 at 7:17
    
I get the following error: [MissingMethodException: No parameterless constructor defined for this object.] System.RuntimeTypeHandle.CreateInstance(RuntimeType type, Boolean publicOnly, Boolean noCheck, Boolean& canBeCached, RuntimeMethodHandleInternal& ctor, Boolean& bNeedSecurityCheck) +0 System.RuntimeType.CreateInstanceSlow(Boolean publicOnly, Boolean skipCheckThis, Boolean fillCache) +117 System.RuntimeType.CreateInstanceDefaultCtor(Boolean publicOnly, Boolean skipVisibilityChecks, Boolean skipCheckThis, Boolean fillCache) +247 –  Janspeed May 4 '12 at 11:42
    
@Janspeed: Why doesn't CalendarUser have a parameterless constructor? In your code xample above CalendarUser doesn't have a constructor at all (which means, it has a parameterless constructor by default). Or do you have a constructor with parameters in another part or this partial class? If yes, you need to add a parameterless constructor manually (just an empty constructor), because once you add a constructor with parameters in C#, the default parameterless constructor is removed. –  Slauma May 4 '12 at 12:55
    
@Janspeed: To your first comment: I still have problems to understand what exactly is the problem. Keep in mind that you don't have a many-to-many relationship but instead two one-to-many relationships because the intermediate entity CalendarUser is an entity and has "payload" due to the IsAdmin flag. So, you don't create directly a relationship between Calendar and User but between Calendar and CalendarUser and between CalendarUser and User. You can also use the collections but it doesn't make creating the relationship easier. –  Slauma May 4 '12 at 13:02
    
Ok seems like I actually talk about two problems at the same time. As for the error message the problem actually lies in my ViewModel and not the actual class I am trying to save which confused me. As for the many to many relationship what I'm looking for is a simpler solution than having to update the relationship between Calendar and Users manually each time I edit the calendar and its users. But I guess with the current database setup your answer is correct so I will mark it as such :) –  Janspeed May 4 '12 at 15:25

You can update the navigation properties and EF will take care of the foreign keys for you. For sample code that handles updates in a similar many-to-many relationship, see the Adding Course Assignments to the Instructor Edit Page section of this tutorial:

http://www.asp.net/mvc/tutorials/getting-started-with-ef-using-mvc/updating-related-data-with-the-entity-framework-in-an-asp-net-mvc-application

share|improve this answer
    
It was a very interesting tutorial but I downloaded the sample and it also maps relations using the OnModelCreating method which makes me confused since I'm not quite sure I can use it working with database first? It feels like I'm missing some key knowledge here that will bind it all together. Maybe I have to abandone Database first and move to code first but I would prefer not to? –  Janspeed May 3 '12 at 7:09

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