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I would like to implement both of these functions so that I would be able to input and output objects of my class. I have gotten the >> operator to work but not so much <<.

Here is my code in my .h file:

    class MyString
    {
        public:
            MyString();
            MyString(char *message);
            ~MyString();
            void Print();



            void Copy(MyString& rhs);
            int Length();

            MyString& operator()(const int index, const char b);
            char& operator()(const int i);
            MyString& operator=(const MyString& rhs);
            bool operator==(const MyString& other) const;
            bool operator!=(const MyString& other) const;
            const MyString operator+(const MyString& rhs) const;

            MyString& operator+=(const MyString& rhs);

       private:

            char *String;
            int Size;
    };

    istream& operator>>(istream& input, MyString& rhs);
    ostream& operator<<(ostream& output, const MyString& rhs);

Here is my code for the two functions in my .cpp file:

 MyString::MyString()
{
    char temp[] = "Hello World";

    int counter(0);
    while(temp[counter] != '\0') {
            counter++;
    }
    Size = counter;
    String = new char [Size];
    for(int i=0; i < Size; i++)
            String[i] = temp[i];

}
MyString::MyString(char *message)
 {

    int counter(0);

    while(message[counter] != '\0') {
            counter++;
    }
    Size = counter;
    String = new char [Size];
    for(int i=0; i < Size; i++)
            String[i] = message[i];

}

  MyString::~MyString()
  {
    delete [] String;
  }
 int MyString::Length()
  {
    int counter(0);

    while(String[counter] != '\0')
    {
            counter ++;
    }





    return (counter);
  }

const MyString MyString::operator+(const MyString& rhs) const
 {

    char* tmp = new char[Size + rhs.Size +1];

    for(int i = 0; i < Size; i++)
    {
            tmp[i] = String[i];
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < rhs.Size+1; i++)
    {
             tmp[i+Size] = rhs.String[i];
   }

const MyString MyString::operator+(const MyString& rhs) const
  {

    char* tmp = new char[Size + rhs.Size +1];

    for(int i = 0; i < Size; i++)
    {
            tmp[i] = String[i];
    }
    for(int i = 0; i < rhs.Size+1; i++)
    {
            tmp[i+Size] = rhs.String[i];
    }

    MyString result;


    delete [] result.String;
    result.String = tmp;
    result.Size = Size+rhs.Size;

    return result;

  }
MyString& MyString::operator()(const int index, const char b)
 {
    if(String[index] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {

            String[index] = b;
    }


  }

MyString& MyString::operator=(const MyString& rhs)
 {

    if(this != &rhs)
    {

            delete [] String;
            String = new char[rhs.Size];
            Size = rhs.Size;

    for(int i = 0; i < rhs.Size+1 ; i++)
    {
            String[i] = rhs.String[i];
    }



    }

    return *this;


 }
  void MyString::Copy(MyString& rhs)
 {
    delete [] String;
    Size = rhs.Size;
    String = new char[rhs.Size];

    String = rhs.String;
  }

MyString& MyString::operator+=(const MyString& rhs)
  {

    char* tmp = new char[Size + rhs.Size + 1];

    for(int i = 0; i < Size; i++)
    {
            tmp[i] = String[i];
    }

    for(int i = 0; i <rhs.Size+1; i++)
    {
            tmp[i+Size] = rhs.String[i];
    }


    delete [] String;
    String = tmp;

    Size += rhs.Size;

    return *this;


 }

bool MyString::operator!=(const MyString& other) const
 {

    return !(*this == other);


  }
bool MyString::operator==(const MyString& other)const
  {
    if(other.Size == this->Size)
    {
            for(int i = 0; i < this->Size+1; i++)
            {
                    if(&other == this)

                            return true;
            }
    }
    else
            return false;
  }

 char& MyString::operator()(const int i)
{

    if( String[i] == '\0')
    {
            exit(1);
    }
    else
    {

    return String[i];

      }
 }



   void MyString::Print()
 {
    for(int i=0; i < Size; i++)
            cout << String[i];
    cout << endl;

  }




istream& operator>>(istream& input, MyString& rhs)
{
    char* temp;
    int size(256);
    temp = new char[size];
    input.getline(temp,size);
    rhs = MyString(temp);
    delete [] temp;

    return input;
}

ostream& operator<<(ostream& output, const MyString& rhs)
{
    char* p;
    int size(256);
    p = new char[size];
    output << rhs.MyString(p);
    delete [] p;
    return output;
}

Here is how it is called in the main.cpp file:

cin >> SearchString >> TargetString; // Test of cascaded string-extraction operator<</*

if(SearchString.Find(ConstString) != -1) {       
  cout << ConstString << " is not in " << SearchString << endl;  } 

else {       
  cout << ConstString << " is in " << SearchString << endl;
  cout << "Details of the hit: " << endl;       
  cout << "Starting poisition of the hit: " << SearchString.Find(ConstString) << endl;                
  cout << "The matching substring is: " << SearchString.Substring(SearchString.Find(ConstString), ConstString.length()); }

Again, the cin>> operator works perfectly but please help me to figure out how to output the string.

share|improve this question
    
You know that there is a getline() function that reads std::string, right? –  Let_Me_Be Apr 30 '12 at 12:58
    
I've used getline() to implement the >> operator, but I can use that to implement << as well?? –  user1363061 Apr 30 '12 at 13:10
    
No, I was pointing out that you are using the char* variant of getline(). There is a std::string variant. As for the << operator, since getline() reads from the stream and you want to write to the stream, then logically no, you can't use getline(). –  Let_Me_Be Apr 30 '12 at 13:12
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1 Answer

Not really sure what you are asking. The implementation depends on how you want to output the string.

For some raw output the code will most likely look like this:

output << rhs.get_data();
share|improve this answer
    
would that be output = rhs.get_data(); ?? –  user1363061 Apr 30 '12 at 13:11
    
output is a stream, just like cout. Your operator<< function should write data from rhs to output using statements like output << rhs.foo() or output << rhs.bar(). –  Nate Kohl Apr 30 '12 at 13:14
    
@user1363061 How do you get the content of your string? It will be rhs.something(). So just write output << rhs.something();. –  Let_Me_Be Apr 30 '12 at 13:15
    
so would I have to implement an additional function for get_data()? –  user1363061 Apr 30 '12 at 13:18
    
@user1363061 Well, how do you access the content of your string? –  Let_Me_Be Apr 30 '12 at 13:21
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