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I want a 20 character NULL('\0') terminating string filled with white spaces.

Currently I am doing it in following way

char foo[20];  
for (i = 0; i < num_space_req; i++)        //num_space_req < 20  
{  
    foo[i] = ' ';  
}

foo[num_space_req] = '\0';

Is there a better way for above?

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5  
std::fill (foo, foo + num_space_req, ' '); –  chris Apr 30 '12 at 13:40
3  
Please try to avoid tagging questions with both C and C++ unless you really need a cross-language solution. They are vastly different languages once you remove all the legacy C stuff that C++ coders shouldn't be using anyway :-) –  paxdiablo Apr 30 '12 at 13:42
    
You've gotten a lot of good answers. You might want to accept one of them. –  octopusgrabbus Apr 30 '12 at 17:15

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted
std::string foo(num_space_req,' ');
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You can use the following to initialize the array to spaces:

memset(foo, ' ', num_space_req);
foo[num_space_req] = '\0';
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Downvoter: care to comment? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 13:50
    
Downvoter must be jealous of you ;) +1 –  Invictus Apr 30 '12 at 14:32
    
I didn't downvote, but using memset wouldn't be my first choice. –  bames53 Apr 30 '12 at 17:08
    
@bames53: Given that this question is tagged (amongst other things) as C, what would you choose? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 17:09
    
Tagging questions with both C and C++ is usually a result of ignorance on the part of the asker, so I always take it to mean a C++ solution is acceptable. Otherwise they'd just tag it as C. –  bames53 Apr 30 '12 at 17:18

Since the question has a C++ tag, the idiomatic way would be:

std::fill(foo, foo + num_space_req, ' ');
// or
std::fill_n(foo, num_space_req, ' ');

Note that it doesn't work in C.

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You may use memset for that kind of thing.

memset (foo, ' ', num_space_req)

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstring/memset/

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As @OliCharlesworth said, the best way is to use memset:

char bla[20];

memset(bla, ' ', sizeof bla - 1);
bla[sizeof bla - 1] = '\0';

Note that in GNU C, you can also use the following extension (range designated initializers):

char bla[20] = {[0 ... 18] = ' ', [19] = '\0'};
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If you want the array initialized at compile time, you can modify your char foo[20]; declaration as follows:

char foo[20] = {0x20};

If you need to initialize the array to spaces at run time, then you can use the following:

memset(foo, ' ', sizeof(foo) -1);
foo[20] = '\0';
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memset MIGHT be better optimised than your for loop, it might be exactly the same. pick one of:

memset( foo, ' ', sizeof(foo) -1 );
memset( foo, ' ', 19 );
memset( foo, ' ', 19 * sizeof(char) );
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#include <cstring>
void makespace(char *foo, size_t size) {
  memset((void*)&foo, ' ', size - 1);
  foo[size] = 0;
}
// ...
makespace(foo, 20);
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