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I have data that looks like this. And I want to find the maximum and minimum densities given the list of standard deviations (SD) and means (MEAN) below:

info0 info1 info2 SD Mean
10x     0       e0      0.38    1.14
10x     0       e2      0.74    1.48
10x     0       e4      1       1.85
10x     0       e6      1.24    2.27
10x     0.1     e0      0.35    1.13
10x     0.1     e2      0.69    1.44
10x     0.1     e4      0.96    1.82
10x     0.1     e6      1.21    2.23
10x     0.5     e0      0.34    1.12
10x     0.5     e2      0.67    1.4
10x     0.5     e4      0.95    1.75
10x     0.5     e6      1.19    2.17
10x     1       e0      0.29    1.09
10x     1       e2      0.59    1.32
10x     1       e4      0.87    1.66
10x     1       e6      1.11    2.06
10x     2       e0      0.23    1.06
10x     2       e2      0.5     1.24
10x     2       e4      0.79    1.54
10x     2       e6      1.04    1.9
10x     4       e0      0.22    1.0.5
10x     4       e2      0.41    1.15
10x     4       e4      0.65    1.37
10x     4       e6      0.91    1.7

I tried this but fail.

dat <- read.table("test.dat", header = TRUE)
densities <- apply(dat[, 4:5], 1, function(x) rnorm(n = 1000000, mean = x[2], sd = x[1]))

maxden <- max(densities)
minden  <- min(densities)

What's the right way to do it?

share|improve this question
1  
Min and max densities of what? Can you give a little bit more context please? Given a normal distribution with a specified mean and sd, the max probability density is 1/sqrt(2*pisigma^2) , but I don't think that's what you're looking for. The maximum and minimum *possible values are +/- infinity. The max and min values in a sample of N random normal deviates can be computed, but will depend heavily on N ... extreme value theory would help you get the max and min expected values in a sample of size N ... What problem are you trying to solve? –  Ben Bolker Apr 30 '12 at 13:57
    
I'm guessing the problem with the means being a factor is the 1.0.5 you have. –  Tyler Rinker Apr 30 '12 at 14:00
    
Now that I think about it I shouldn't have answered so hastily. Where did it fail and what's the error message? –  Tyler Rinker Apr 30 '12 at 14:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let me first suggest that you not operate on such a huge data set and such a large number of n in the rnorm. This makes it easy to throw a browser in the code and figure out what's happening. First the means in your data is a factor because of something you did with formatting.

 str(dat)
'data.frame':   24 obs. of  5 variables:
 $ info0: Factor w/ 1 level "10x": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
 $ info1: num  0 0 0 0 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.5 0.5 ...
 $ info2: Factor w/ 4 levels "e0","e2","e4",..: 1 2 3 4 1 2 3 4 1 2 ...
 $ SD   : num  0.38 0.74 1 1.24 0.35 0.69 0.96 1.21 0.34 0.67 ...
 $ Mean : Factor w/ 24 levels "1.0.5","1.06",..: 6 13 19 24 5 12 18 23 4 11 ...

That has to be addressed in the code.

Now we can see use the code to get what we want (you'll have to adjust the n in rnorm and supply more rows to the code when you actually use it but for testing purposes this was ideal):

densities <- apply(dat[1:10, 4:5], 1, function(x) {
        rnorm(n = 10, mean = as.numeric(x[2]), sd = as.numeric(x[1]))
    }
)
share|improve this answer
    
I think the OP is then asking for apply(densities,2,range), but I'm not sure what the answer means. –  Ben Bolker Apr 30 '12 at 14:00

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