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I wrote a a function that has two arguments and therefore can concatenate 2 arrays of character strings. However, I need to use the same function to concatenate five arguments. That's where I am stuck, because my function does not work properly. I keeps only the last append. I pasted the code bellow. Your help will be appreciated. I wrote the code in C++, and I am using dev-C++.

#include<iostream>
#include<conio.h>


using namespace std;


char *Append(char *str, char *add)
{
 int m=5;
 static char buffer[150];  
 char *p=buffer;
 while(*p++=*str++);
 p--;
 while(*p++=*add++);  

 return buffer;  

}

int main()
{
 static char *buffer1;
 char *temp=" "; 
 char *str="Be, ";
 char *add="or not to be, ";
 char *str3="that's the question ";
 char *str4="Whether 'tis Nobler in the mind to suffer ";
 char *str5="The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,";

 buffer1=Append(str, add);
 cout<<buffer1;
 ///while(*temp++=*buffer1++);//where the problem starts!  
 /// temp--;
 Append(temp, str);    ///i am trying to append all strings into temp!!
 buffer1=Append (temp, add);
 cout<<endl<<buffer1;


 getch();
 return 0;
}
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3  
Using a static local here is really not a good idea, you should be using heap-based memory for your ongoing builds of new strings. I assume you cannot use std::string because of the parameters of your project? Because that is the obvious choice here. –  Steve Townsend Apr 30 '12 at 13:53
    
are you talking about the one in the main or Append function? –  T4000 Apr 30 '12 at 13:57
1  
and the reason you are not using std::string is? –  PlasmaHH Apr 30 '12 at 13:58
    
They are equally inadvisable. Avoid globals unless you absolutely must have them. Since you only ever have one main, making a local variable static there does not add much. In general in C++ you want to avoid raw pointers and use RAII types (classes) that encapsulate them instead - in the case of C-String that type is std::string –  Steve Townsend Apr 30 '12 at 13:58
6  
@T4000: If your professor wrote that code, you need to ask the department head to arrange some additional C++ training for him. That code is terrible. Let me count the ways: unused variable m. static variable in main. Binding non-const char* to string literals. Using char* in the function signature where const char* would be appropriate. Not checking for buffer overflow. Beyond these things which are clearly wrong, the whole approach is questionable. –  Ben Voigt Apr 30 '12 at 14:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're writing the concatenated string into a static buffer (static char buffer[150];). Every time you call the append function, you write into the same buffer, which means you overwrite the string created by the previous call to append.

 buffer1=Append(str, add); // buffer1 contains "Be, or not to be, "
 Append(temp, str); // buffer1 now contains " Be, " even though you don't assign the result of Append to buffer1

However, you can still make it work if you do:

buffer1=Append(str, add);
Append(buffer1, str3);
Append(buffer1, str4);
Append(buffer1, str5);

Though you have to be careful not to overrun your buffer.

This works because when you pass buffer1 in as the first string the append function's first step becomes copying the previously concatenated string into itself, and the second step is to add on the new string.

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I see my mistake now. I tried that at one point, but because buffer1 was static, it overwrote itself and I ended up only with the last string into buffer1. Now I fixed everything, and it works fine. Thanks for your help! –  T4000 Apr 30 '12 at 14:14
1  
@T4000: It has nothing to do with whether buffer1 (your pointer in main()) is static. main() is only called once, static on a primitive type has absolutely no effect. –  Ben Voigt Apr 30 '12 at 14:33

your question is not completely clear to me.Still,assuming that you want Append() to be used multiple times to concatenate consecutive 5 string, use main() like this.

int main()
 {
 static char *buffer1;
 char *temp=" "; 
 char *str="Be, ";
 char *add="or not to be, ";
 char *str3="that's the question ";
 char *str4="Whether 'tis Nobler in the mind to suffer ";
 char *str5="The Slings and Arrows of outrageous Fortune,";

 buffer1=Append(str, add);
 cout<<buffer1;
 ///while(*temp++=*buffer1++);//where the problem starts!  
 /// temp--;
 buffer1=Append(buffer1, str3);    ///i am trying to append all strings into temp!!
 buffer1=Append(buffer1,str4);
 buffer1=Append(buffer1,str5);
 cout<<endl<<buffer1;


 getch();
return 0;
}
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