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My code is as follows:

SET @var = (SELECT var FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName)

IF (@@ROWCOUNT > 0)
    BEGIN
        //carry out insert
    END

Am I right in saying this will always return a 1 for @@ROWCOUNT as it carries out an assignment last?

If so, what would be the most elegant solution to allow me to:

  • Create variable with the result from my query stored in it
  • Test if the query returns any results
share|improve this question
2  
Have you tried the above set statement when there are 0, 1 and more than one matching rows? – Shannon Severance Apr 30 '12 at 14:17
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The reason it returns one is because you've assigned exactly one value (some arbitrary value). You should be using EXISTS instead of doing a manual count anyway, as @Sive suggests. The reason is that EXISTS can perform no worse than COUNT, and in the use case you're describing, it doesn't really matter what the actual count is anyway. You want to know if the count is zero or greater than zero.

The problem with assigning that value to a variable in the way you've done it, is what happens if there are multiple rows that match? Let's try it:

DECLARE @foo TABLE([var] INT, varname SYSNAME);
INSERT @foo VALUES (1,N'bob'),(2,N'bob');
DECLARE @var INT;
SET @var = (SELECT [var] FROM @foo WHERE varname = N'bob

Result:

Msg 512, Level 16, State 1, Line 4
Subquery returned more than 1 value. This is not permitted when the subquery follows =, !=, <, <= , >, >= or when the subquery is used as an expression.

Now, if varname is unique, I would do this:

SELECT @var = [var] FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName;
IF @var IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
    // carry out insert
END
ELSE
BEGIN
    PRINT 'Already existed! ' + RTRIM(@var);
END

If varname is not unique, then I'm not sure what you're going to do with a single value. Which one did it pull? Imagine this scenario:

DECLARE @foo TABLE([var] INT, varname SYSNAME);
INSERT @foo VALUES (3,N'bob'),(2,N'adam'),(1,N'bob');
DECLARE @var INT;
SELECT @var = [var] FROM @foo WHERE varname = N'bob';
PRINT @var;

Will @var be 1 or 3? Who knows? Why does it matter which one it is if you're only capturing one of potentially many values? Are you going to do something with that row but not the others?

In addition, if your intention is to insert data from this table, why not simply throw out the up-front check, the row count etc. and just say:

INSERT dbo.SomeTable(column1 --,...other columns
  SELECT var --,...other columns
  FROM dbo.varDB
  WHERE varName = @varName;

The insert won't happen if the row doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer

You can do something like this using EXISTS. This will check if at least one record exists for the given value in @varName before carrying out your statements enclosed between BEGIN and END.

Script:

 IF EXISTS (SELECT var FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName)
    BEGIN
         //carry out insert
    END

MSDN Documentation: EXISTS (Transact-SQL)

Based on comments, update #1:

I don't understand the requirement to know the value. I think you might want to use a COUNT, if you are looking to fetch the count.

DECLARE @recordsCount
SELECT @recordsCount = COUNT(var) FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName

IF recordsCount > 0 
BEGIN
  // your statements
END

Based on comments, update #2:

If you would like to use the result set itself inside the BEGIN and END, then the question needs more details about how the result set would be used inside the statements. Based on further inputs, may be you won't even need the IF statement. Further details needed to provide a clear solution to your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
How would I then access the result returned from my query inside the IF statement? – Simon Kiely Apr 30 '12 at 14:04
    
Why do you care what the actual count is? Don't you only care if there is already at least one row or zero rows? If it returned 1, 2, or 3 would you do anything differently? – Aaron Bertrand Apr 30 '12 at 14:05
    
I only need to know (a) if a value exists and (b) what the value returned is. – Simon Kiely Apr 30 '12 at 14:06
    
My question was for the OP. I thought that would be obvious. – Aaron Bertrand Apr 30 '12 at 14:07
1  
@Siva if @var in the original query holds the string 'blat', and the intent is to use @var in a subsequent insert, how does @recordsCount help him? – Aaron Bertrand Apr 30 '12 at 14:19

You can set your variable to NULL (just to be sure).

If your query returns no rows, @var is still NULL.
If it returns one row, @var will have a value
If it returns more than one row you will have an exception.

SET @var = NULL

SET @var = (SELECT var FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName)
IF @var IS NOT NULL
BEGIN
//carry out insert
END

Update

If you really want to use @@ROWCOUNT instead you can assign your value using select instead of set.

SELECT @var = var FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName
IF (@@ROWCOUNT > 0)
BEGIN
//carry out insert
END
share|improve this answer
3  
What if the selected value of var happens to be NULL? – HABO Apr 30 '12 at 14:24
1  
@user92546 that's why I think it is safer to combine the insert and select into one operation. But Siva is right, the question needs clarification given all the time people have already spent spinning their wheels over what should be a simple solution. – Aaron Bertrand Apr 30 '12 at 14:25
1  
If OP wants to do something with a NULL value this will not work. – Mikael Eriksson Apr 30 '12 at 14:26

You can select and test the count of returned rows:

SELECT @var = var FROM dbo.varDB WHERE varName = @varName
IF (@@ROWCOUNT > 0)
BEGIN
   //carry out insert
END
share|improve this answer
1  
@p.campbell Not true. Please try this: declare @x int select @x = null from someaTable where 1 = 0 print @@rowcount. Change sometable to your table, obviously. – Nikola Markovinović Apr 30 '12 at 14:08
1  
@p.campbell Would you mind canceling your downvote? – Nikola Markovinović Apr 30 '12 at 14:15
1  
+1 from me instead. Just saw your post after my edit. – Mikael Eriksson Apr 30 '12 at 14:42

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