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I am asked to create a Substring() method that returns a substring of the original string which begins at location start and is as long as length

Here is how I attempted to implement the function in my .cpp file:

MyString sub;

sub = new char[length];

for(int i = start; i <length; i++)
{
    sub[i] = this[i];
}

return sub;

and I got this error:

error: expected unqualified-id before [ token MyString.cpp:206: error: no match for operator[] in sub[i]

Note: I am not supposed to overload []. MyString is the defined class.

What exactly am I doing wrong?

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2  
We probably need to see the definition of MyString before we can provide a meaningful answer. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 30 '12 at 15:02
    
this is a pointer so try using this->substr instead of this.substr –  CppLearner Apr 30 '12 at 15:02
    
Do you understand what MyString is? If not, that's your starting point. We don't know what it is, you don't tell us. The errors are pretty self explanatory though (esp. if you have some good course notes or a book) –  Nim Apr 30 '12 at 15:03
    
You have posted a couple of questions already, and have been suggested not to return references before. Why do you keep on returning references? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 30 '12 at 15:06
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas I have fixed that error.Thanks –  user1363061 Apr 30 '12 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It simply means that this.substr() is not valid C++. this is a pointer to the current object. So unless the method MyString::substr() exists, you can't do that.

Starting from that, I don't know which members there are in your MyString class. If there is a std::string, you can use the substr method on it. f the underlying member is just a char*, you will have to use simple array and c-string operations on it to extract a subtring from it.

With an exemple. If your class is like this

class MyString
{
    private:
        std::string _str;

    public:
        // Constructor
        MyString(std::string str);
        // Your method
        MyString Substring(int start, int length) const;
};

Then your Substring method will be like this:

MyString MyString::Substring(int start, int length) const
{
    return MyString(_str.substr(start, length));
}

On the other hand, if your class MyString is like that:

class MyString
{
    private:
        char* _str;

    public:
        // Constructor
        MyString(char* str);
        // Your method
        MyString Substring(int start, int length) const;
};

Then your method will be like this:

MyString MyString::Substring(int start, int length) const
{
    char* res_str = new char[length+1];
    memcpy(res_str, (char*) _str + start, length);
    res_str[length] = '\0';
    return MyString(res_str);
}

EDIT : If we look at the code you provided (after last edit), it seems that you are actually using an underlying char*. So let's have a look at what you wrote^^

MyString sub;
sub = new char[length];

What you want to do is actually modify the characters of the underlying char*. So what you should have done is:

char* sub;
sub = new char[length];

So instead of creating a new MyString, you will create a new char*. You can't directly assign a char* to a MyString (or at least, it's what I think). Now, let's look a the other part of your code:

for(int i = start; i <length; i++)
{

        sub[i] = this[i];
}

this is a pointer to MyString. So this[i] is equivalent to this.operator which is incalid since this is a pointer. You can't have this followed by a dot. However, if you had written this->operator, it would have searched for a function like char& MyString::operator[](int i). Since you did not defined this function, you would still have a compiler error (it's also the one you currently have for sub[i] since you defined sub as a MyString. You should write:

for (int i = start; i < length; i++)
{
    sub[i] = _str[i];
}

But it's still provided _str is a char* in your class. Then you will be able to finish your function by:

return MyString(sub);

But there, it's provided that your MyString class has a constructor that takes a char* as a parameter :)

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2  
Even if MyString::substr() exists, you still can't do that. He needs this->, not this. . –  Robᵩ Apr 30 '12 at 15:04
    
Yes, my first attempt was not correct at all so I have to go forward with the second attempt and I will edit my post so you can see what I've done so far. –  user1363061 Apr 30 '12 at 15:07
    
Prefer not to use leading underscores, as they are reserved for compiler usage. Trailing underscores can be used. –  Thomas Matthews Apr 30 '12 at 15:14
    
If the goal of the assignment is to write a substring class, isn't it pointless to use std::string::substring()? –  Thomas Matthews Apr 30 '12 at 15:16
    
@ThomasMatthews Yeah, I think so, but him trying to use the substr function should mean that there probably is an underlying std::string class, right? –  Morwenn Apr 30 '12 at 15:19

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