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I have been searching for a solution to a problem and came across a post answered by JasonMArcher and wonder if I could be more specific as to my needs.

We have recently changed to a new server and because of a change in it's name from //sbcmaster to //sbcserver1 I have a huge problem where I have hundreds of .lnk files need to be edited so that the shortcut retrieves the document.

The question is - Is it possible to automate this process?

Appreciation in advance!!

Mark

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I haven't tried it but maybe you can search and replace the values and see if it works –  juergen d Apr 30 '12 at 15:11
    
This probably doesn't help in your case, but one piece of advice I got on another forum a long time ago that I've taken to heart is using .url files for doing links instead of platform specific link files like .lnk this would have made your life much easier –  ControlAltDel Apr 30 '12 at 15:14
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2 Answers

If you use run/cmd you can edit the filename (with rename). Then a friendly editor like Notepad++ will open that file. You can see the text, and there will also be a lot of NULLs. You can edit the text. Then you can save the file, and then change the name back with rename. Good luck.

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The Microsoft documentation for Shell Links points to the IShellLink::GetPath and IShellLink::SetPath functions.

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I have tried using UltraEdit to see whether it is possible to search and replace the occurance of the old server... but unfortunately as son as you try and 'edit' the .lnl file the system tries to open the short cut!! So it is impossible to get at the file... Any suggestions? –  Markolarko May 1 '12 at 9:53
    
Goto cmd and give the command edit <filename>.lnk ; but it is more difficult to edit this from cmd. I think taking this file to a linux computer and opening it in a hex editor would be a better idea; however I'm not sure if linux recognises .lnk as shortcut as well –  user13267 Nov 8 '12 at 7:39
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