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What are the performance benefits or penalties of using goto with a modern C++ compiler?

I am writing a C++ code generator and use of goto will make it easier to write. No one will touch the resulting C++ files so don't get all "goto is bad" on me. As a benefit, they save the use of temporary variables.

I was wondering, from a purely compiler optimization perspective, the result that goto has on the compiler's optimizer? Does it make code faster, slower, or generally no change in performance compared to using temporaries / flags.

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But... they are! –  Mr Lister Apr 30 '12 at 15:30
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@MrLister: in C or in C++ ? In C I would say goto is necessary. In C++, I don't see any reason to use them... we already have exceptions! –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '12 at 15:40
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@MatthieuM. please, don't use exceptions as glorified gotos. Exceptions are great for exceptional cases; errors and unexpected events. If you want to change control flow, don't use exceptions for that, but rather something specialized such as if statements or even gotos. There are rare cases in C++ where a goto is appropriate, and using an exception instead leads to runtime overhead and confusion. –  user1203803 Apr 30 '12 at 15:45
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@unixman83: It might be helpful if you could post a small example of the kind of code your generator will create. That way we can assess the possible efficiency you'll gain and whether using goto is the most appropriate way to acheive this. –  Component 10 Apr 30 '12 at 15:56
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@classdaknok_t: I believe you have Matthieu's intent backwards. It's not about using exceptions as glorified gotos. It's about using gotos to emulate exceptions because C doesn't support them. –  Benjamin Lindley Apr 30 '12 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The part of a compiler that would be affected works with a flow graph. The syntax you use to create a particular flow graph will normally be irrelevant -- if you create something like a while loop using a goto instead of an actual while statement, it's not going to affect the optimizer at all (by that point, the syntax that produced the flow graph will be long gone).

It is possible, however, to produce a flow graph with gotos that couldn't be produced by any normal flow control statements (loops, switch, etc.) In such a case, you may produce an irreducible flow graph, and when/if you do, that will often limit the ability of the compiler to optimize the code.

In other words, if (for example) you took code that was written with normal for, while, switch, etc., and converted it to use goto in every case, but retained the same structure, almost any reasonably modern compiler would probably produce essentially identical code either way. If, however, you use gotos to produce the mess of spaghetti like much of the FORTRAN I had to look at decades ago, then the compiler probably won't be able to do much with it.

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Does not Turing completeness assures us that whatever mess can be created with goto, we can create an equivalent without it ? –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '12 at 15:39
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@MatthieuM.: I suppose you could view it in terms of Turing completeness, but it's been studied much more specifically than that, and at least IIRC, there are proofs that the accepted elements of structured programming are sufficient to produce any possible flow of control (though sometimes at the expense of duplicating code or introducing extra variables). –  Jerry Coffin Apr 30 '12 at 15:43
    
@JerryCoffin Your answer about use of gotos in the second case is very vague. So the compiler just inserts a raw JMP instruction? –  unixman83 Apr 30 '12 at 15:46
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@unixman83: Maybe an example would help it make more sense. Consider loop hoisting -- moving a computation out of a loop if it has the same effect every iteration. To do that, the compiler has to be able to figure out the boundary of what is or isn't "the loop", and it has to be sure you won't jump into the middle of the loop without executing the code it put before it. Without that, it can't hoist the code out of the loop. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 30 '12 at 15:51
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@ccurtsinger: yes, probably poor wording on my part -- in this case, "irreducible" doesn't mean it couldn't theoretically be reduced, only that the compiler doesn't know how to do it. Ultimately, this is pretty much what Matthieu's comment (and my reply) discuss as well. In most cases it's probably not even as much a matter of not being able to reduce the flow graph, as not being able to prove much when it does so, thus losing the chances for optimization. –  Jerry Coffin Apr 30 '12 at 16:54

I was wondering, from a purely compiler optimzation prespective, the result that goto's have on the compiler's optimizer? Does it make code faster, slower, or generally no change in performance compared to using temporaries / flags.

Why do you care? Your primary concern should be getting your code generator to create the correct code. Efficiency is of much less importance than correctness. Your question should be "Will my use of gotos make my generated code more likely or less likely to be correct?"

Look at the code generated by lex/yacc or flex/bison. That code is chock full of gotos. There's a good reason for that. lex and yacc implement finite state machines. Since the machine goes to another state at state transitions, the goto is arguably the most natural tool for such transitions.

There is a simple way to eliminate those gotos in many cases by using a while loop around a switch statement. This is structured code. Per Douglas Jones (Jones D. W., How (not) to code a finite state machine, SIGPLAN Not. 23, 8 (Aug. 1988), 19-22.), this is the worst way to encode a FSM. He argues that a goto-based scheme is better.

He also argues that there is an even better approach, which is convert your FSM to a control flow diagram using graph theory techniques. That's not always easy. It is an NP hard problem. That's why you still see a lot of FSMs, particularly auto-generated FSMs, implemented as either a loop around a switch or with state transitions implemented via gotos.

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"Why do you care? Your primary concern should be getting your code generator to create the correct code." Now that's the right mindset I respect. –  SigTerm Apr 30 '12 at 16:59
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It's certainly the primary concern. However, the decision to shun goto can also be seen as a premature pessimization. Whether you use them or not is a decision either way, and as with all decisions should be made considering evidence at hand. The conventional decision to shun them is based on evidence which doesn't apply here (maintainability) and therefore other reasons are needed. –  MSalters Apr 30 '12 at 20:59

How do you think that loops are represented, at the assembly level ?

Using jump instructions to labels...

Many compilers will actually use jumps even in their Intermediate Representation:

int loop(int* i) {
  int result = 0;
  while(*i) {
    result += *i;
  }
  return result;
}

int jump(int* i) {
  int result = 0;
  while (true) {
    if (not *i) { goto end; }
    result += *i;
  }

end:
  return result;
}

Yields in LLVM:

define i32 @_Z4loopPi(i32* nocapture %i) nounwind uwtable readonly {
  %1 = load i32* %i, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %2 = icmp eq i32 %1, 0
  br i1 %2, label %3, label %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge

.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge:                    ; preds = %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge, %0
  br label %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge

; <label>:3                                       ; preds = %0
  ret i32 0
}

define i32 @_Z4jumpPi(i32* nocapture %i) nounwind uwtable readonly {
  %1 = load i32* %i, align 4, !tbaa !0
  %2 = icmp eq i32 %1, 0
  br i1 %2, label %3, label %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge

.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge:                    ; preds = %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge, %0
  br label %.lr.ph..lr.ph.split_crit_edge

; <label>:3                                       ; preds = %0
  ret i32 0
}

Where br is the branch instruction (a conditional jump).

All optimizations are performed on this structure. So, goto is the bread and butter of optimizers.

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I guess the question is whether using goto prevents the compiler from inferring certain optimisations. –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 15:27
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@OliCharlesworth: I doubt it. The danger with goto is the issue on scopes (esp. jumping into a scope). I added the intermediate representation of LLVM (I suppose gcc's is quite similar) which is composed of blocks linked by jumps... and which is the representation on which optimizations are performed. –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '12 at 15:36
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@Matthieu And there are clearly possible control flows that can't be reproduced with structured constructs, so gotos can have an effect there. One example I can think of, is that the simple single pass SSA generation doesn't work for arbitrary gotos - while you can achieve the same effect it's much more involved. –  Voo Apr 30 '12 at 16:09
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@Voo: does it work for Duff's Device ? Even though there is no literal goto, the use of switch to jump right in the middle of a loop is quite "unstructured". The point is, I believe that C and C++ are complicated enough that for any control flow graph generated for a goto implementation, an equivalent implementation without goto can be found that produces the same control flow graph. –  Matthieu M. Apr 30 '12 at 16:45
    
@MatthieuM. You're correct. In fact, even a very simple subset of C/C++'s structured control flow is sufficient to cover any possible control flow you could write with gotos. –  ccurtsinger Apr 30 '12 at 17:02

I agree heartily with David Hammen's answer, but I only have one point to add.

When people are taught about compilers, they are taught about all the wonderful optimizations that compilers can do.

They are not taught that the actual value of this depends on who the user is.

If the code you are writing (or generating) and compiling contains very few function calls and could itself consume a large fraction of some other program's time, then yes, compiler optimization matters.

If the code being generated contains function calls, or if for some other reason the program counter spends a small fraction of its time in the generated code, it's not worth worrying about. Why? Because even if that code could be so aggressively optimized that it took zero time, it would save no more than that small fraction, and there are probably much bigger performance issues, that the compiler can't fix, that are happy to be evading your attention.

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