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Complete the following method which takes a string, and for each repeating sequence of characters in the string, removes all but one of them. For example, given the input string "AAAABCCDDDDAACCCCCC", the method should return "ABCDAC".

YOUR CODE MUST BE RECURSIVE. Do not use any loops (while, do/while, or for). Do not declare any variables outside of the method. You may declare local variables inside the method.

public static String eliminateRepeats (String s)
{
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Language? Is this homework? –  Tudor Apr 30 '12 at 15:46
    
Sounds like homework ;) –  Jonathan Payne Apr 30 '12 at 15:46
    
@Tudor his "public static String eliminateRepeats(String s)" is java. –  Jonathan Payne Apr 30 '12 at 15:47
1  
What have you tried? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 15:47
1  
@JonathanPayne: Could also be C#, but Java is slightly more likely, based on the capitalisation of the types and the method name. –  Guffa Apr 30 '12 at 15:49

3 Answers 3

The trick here is that you need a loop to solve this, so you just fake a loop by calling the method recursively with smaller and smaller parts of the string.

There is no way to divide the work into smaller parts, as one usually does when using recursion (like for example split the string in half). You just have to process one character at a time, and call the method with the rest of the string.

Example in C#:

public static string EliminateRepeats(string s) {
  return
    s.Length == 1 ?
      s
    :
      (s[0] != s[1] ? s.Substring(0, 1) : "")
      + EliminateRepeats(s.Substring(1));
}

(Code inspired by Jonathan Paynes code.)

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Upvotes for credit ;) –  Jonathan Payne Apr 30 '12 at 17:34
    
... and suffers from the same error: Fails on empty Strings. –  user unknown May 2 '12 at 0:18
    
@userunknown: That's easily fixed if that is required. Change == 1 to < 2. –  Guffa May 2 '12 at 7:04
    
Why the downvote? If you don't explain what you think is wrong with the answer, it can't improve it. –  Guffa May 2 '12 at 8:48
    
@Guffa who knows, they downvoted me as well. –  Jonathan Payne May 2 '12 at 20:55
public class Recurse
{
    public static void main( String args[] )
    {
        System.out.println( recurse( "AAAABCCDDDDAACCCCCC" ) );
    }

    private static String recurse( String s )
    {
        if ( s == null || s.equalsIgnoreCase("") )
        {
            return "";
        }
        else if ( s.length() > 1 )
        {
            if ( !s.substring( 0 , 1 ).equalsIgnoreCase( s.substring( 1 , 2 ) ) )
            {
                return s.substring( 0 , 1 ) + recurse( s.substring( 1 ) );
            }

            return recurse( s.substring( 1 ) );
        }
        else
        {
            return s.substring( 0 , 1 );
        }
    }
}
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That would work, however you are using the output buffer as a global variable instead of returning the result, so it would not meet the requirements of the assignment. –  Guffa Apr 30 '12 at 16:03
    
@Guffa good catch, updated. –  Jonathan Payne Apr 30 '12 at 17:32
    
I don't understand why people so often offer 'ignoreCase', without being asked for. –  user unknown May 1 '12 at 20:49
    
@userunknown updated for null and "" check. –  Jonathan Payne May 2 '12 at 20:54
// use a default value for the lastchar for the first char, 
// which is impossible to meet in an regular string
def concentrate (s: String, lastchar: Char = 0) : String = {
    // recursive methods always need to know when it is enough
    if (s.length == 0) s else 
    if (s(0) == lastchar) concentrate (s.substring (1), lastchar) else 
    s(0) +  concentrate (s.substring (1), s(0)) }

concentrate ("AAAABCCDDDDAACCCCCC")

Here is a tailrecursive variation:

@tailrec 
def concentrate (s: String, carry:String = "", lastchar: Char = 0) : String = {
    if (s.length == 0) carry else 
    if (s(0) == lastchar) concentrate (s.substring (1), carry, lastchar) else 
    concentrate (s.substring (1), carry + s(0), s(0)) }

It has the recursive call in the last position, since the resulting string gets glued together on the fly, and passed as parameter. In Scala, this can be optimized by the compiler to run nearly as fast as a loop with mutable variables, and it will not blow the stack - not even for very long Strings.

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