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First of all I would like to apologise in adavnce if I won't be very clear in my question. I'm totally new to R and my terminology won't be that good.

We get a SPSS file from an external company that contains survey data. We have an R script to extract the data and write it into a CSV file. This works fine.

The second part of the script build a INI-style file for all the possible aswers. As an example, for the AGE we would have something like

[ AGE ]
1 = Under 13
2 = 13 - 15
3 = 15 - 25
4 = 25+

The CSV file will have one of 1, 2, 3 or 4 for each line. Until recently all possible answers were numbered starting with 1, but now some of them start from 0. Therefore we would like to have something like:

[ AGE ]
0 = Under 13
1 = 13 - 15
2 = 15 - 25
3 = 25+

The following is the current R code that we use. I know where it goes wrong, but I don't know how to correct it.

data<-read.spss(inputFile, to.data.frame=TRUE);
fileOut<- file(valuesExportFile, "w");
for (name in names(data)) {
  cat("[", name,"]\n", file=fileOut);
  variableValues<-levels(data[[name]]);
  numberOfValues<-nlevels(data[[name]]);
  if (numberOfValues > 0) {
     for (i in 1:numberOfValues) {
         cat(i, '= "', variableValues[i], '"', "\n", file=fileOut);
     }
  }
};
close(fileOut);

I have spent a day and a half googling and trying various approach. I did find a perl script, spssread.pl, that extract the data as we want it, but for some reason all the labels names are in uppercase, which is not acceptable as they are case-sensitive. I will keep looking at this script, but in the meantime I would like to see if there is a solution using R, since this is what we use already and it would be nice to have everything in one script.

So, any suggestions?

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1  
Just a thought: cat(i-1,...)? –  joran Apr 30 '12 at 15:58
1  
...where and how does it go wrong then? Is it just the -1 that @joran suggested or are there other problems? –  Tommy Apr 30 '12 at 16:19
    
I can't simply use cat(i-1,...) because some start with 1 and some start with 0. If I open the data file with PSPP and look at the Variable View tab I can see that the values are ordered correctly, some starting with 0 and some starting with 1. SO I guess there must be a way to extract that information from the SPSS file. –  giuliot May 1 '12 at 8:24
    
Have you looked at the data structure you get back if you do not include the as.data.frame=TRUE argument to read.spss? According to the help page, there is an attribute label.table which has (possibly more) information about the value labels than what the data.frame holds. –  Brian Diggs May 1 '12 at 16:41
    
Thank you Brian. Although what you suggested, using label.table didn't work, it kind of put me in the right direction. –  giuliot May 2 '12 at 9:22
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks to Brian Diggs I was able to explore another way and I find a solution, although not a perfect one.

My solution was to extract the data with the use.value.labels=FALSE and then unclass the variable and use the value.labels attribute. I think showing the code would be clearer than me trying to explain it.

data<-read.spss(inputFile, to.data.frame=TRUE, use.value.labels=FALSE);
fileOut<- file(valuesExportFile, "w");
for (name in names(data)) {
    cat("[", name,"]\n", file=fileOut);
    variables<-attr(unclass(data[[name]]), "value.labels");
    for (label in names(variables)) {
        cat(variables[[label]], '= "', label, '"', "\n", file=fileOut);
    }
};
close(fileOut);

The result

[ AGE ]
8 = " 65+ "
7 = " 55 to 64 "
6 = " 45 to 54 "
5 = " 35 to 44 "
4 = " 25 to 34 "
3 = " 21 to 24 "
2 = " 16 to 20 "
1 = " 13 to 15 "
0 = " Under 13 "

although workable, is not ideal. Does anyone know how I could sort them so to have

[ AGE ]
0 = " Under 13 "
1 = " 13 to 15 "
2 = " 16 to 20 "
3 = " 21 to 24 "
4 = " 25 to 34 "
5 = " 35 to 44 "
6 = " 45 to 54 "
7 = " 55 to 64 "
8 = " 65+ "

EDIT: 04/05/12

After some more help from Brian Diggs (see the comments) the final solutions is

data<-read.spss(inputFile, to.data.frame=TRUE, use.value.labels=FALSE);
fileOut<- file(valuesExportFile, "w");
for (name in names(data)) {
    cat("[", name,"]\n", file=fileOut);
    variables<-attr(unclass(data[[name]]), "value.labels");
    variables<-variables[order(as.numeric(variables))];
    for (label in names(variables)) {
        cat(variables[[label]], '= "', label, '"', "\n", file=fileOut);
    }
};
close(fileOut);
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1  
Perhaps, before the for loop, add variables <- sort(variables)? Untested. The idea is to get variables into the right order so when you loop through it, it is printed in the order you want. –  Brian Diggs May 2 '12 at 17:58
    
Thanks Brian. It works fine if I have less than 10 elements. I think the ordering is not done numerically, and therefore "10" comes before "2". –  giuliot May 3 '12 at 8:03
    
Yeah, it's sorting lexically, not numerically. Try variables <- variables[order(as.numeric(variables))] This gets the sort order from the numeric version of variables rather than the string version. –  Brian Diggs May 3 '12 at 19:38
    
Perfetc! Thanks Brian –  giuliot May 4 '12 at 9:08
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