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I don't know why this is erroring, but I'm just trying to add something "akin" to endl so that I can throw what's in an ostringstream to our debugger. I have the following:

class debug_stream_info
{
public:
    debug_stream_info(int errorLine, char *errorFile, int level)
        :m_errorLine(errorLine), m_errorFile(errorFile), m_logLevel(level)
    {
    }

    friend std::basic_ostringstream<char>& operator<<(std::basic_ostringstream<char>& os, debug_stream_info& debug_info);

private:
    int m_errorLine;
    std::string m_errorFile;
    int m_logLevel;

};

std::basic_ostringstream<char>& operator<<(std::basic_ostringstream<char>& os, debug_stream_info& debug_info)
{
    // Write the stream's contents to cpu_debug
    // Deleted custom logging function.  No errors here though

    // Clear the stream for re-use.
    os.str("");
    os.seekp(0);

    return os;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    std::ostringstream myout;
    myout << "hey there" << " and some more " << "Numbers!!: " << 435 << 54.2 << " that's good for numbers" << debug_stream_info(__LINE__, __FILE__, LOG_LEVEL);

    return 0;
}

The error I'm getting is: error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'debug_stream_info' (or there is no acceptable conversion) for the line in main. This is on VS2008.

I'm including sstream, iostream, etc, and have the namespaces set up right. I'm getting no other errors. I even tried replacing all occurrances of basic_ostream with just ostringstream and there was no difference (I'll be having a w_char version later, but I wanted the simple case to work first). I made the object on the line above and then passed a fully-constructed object on the line, and the error was exactly the same. I've changed the signature of the second argument to and from const with no change as well.

Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong here?

Edit: since EVERY response seems to want to put it there, I can NOT use std::ostream because I want this to work ONLY for std::ostringstream (and std::basic_ostringstream) and not for any type of output stream. Besides, the function wouldn't compile with ostream anyways, since I'm using the os.str() method, which isn't in ostream, only the sub-classes.

share|improve this question
3  
I've never seen someone specifically overload for std::basic_ostringstream<char>&. Usually people just overload for std::ostream&. – chrisaycock Apr 30 '12 at 16:02
    
You're defining a template function for std::basic_ostringstream while your variable is std::ostringstream. Maybe that's causing your template function to not be used? – Burton Samograd Apr 30 '12 at 16:03
    
As I said in the original post: I even tried replacing all occurrances of basic_ostream with just ostringstream and there was no difference.. and I can't used just ostream as I only want this overload to work for ostringstream, not all ostream types – Kevin Anderson Apr 30 '12 at 16:04
up vote 6 down vote accepted

The real problem with your code is that you've overloaded std::ostringstream rather than std::ostream. So your code would work if you write this:

debug_stream_info info(/** blah blah**/);

std::ostringstream oss;
oss << info ; //OK

However this will not work:

oss << 1 << info; //ERROR

This is compilation error because the expression oss<<1 returns an object of type std::ostream& which doesn't have overload which takes debug_stream_info as second argument. That means if you use cast as:

static_cast<std::ostringstream&>(oss << 1) << info; //OK

then that should work again.

So the solution is to overload std::ostream, instead of std::basic_ostringstream.

Also, the second parameter should be const & . This is also a problem with your code.

So write this:

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, debug_stream_info const &);
                                                        //^^^^^^^ note this

The second parameter should be const & so that you could write temporary objects to the stream.

share|improve this answer
    
As said above, I can't use ostream because I dont WANT it to work for all ostreams, only the ostringstream. And I tried what you put there for const (both in friend statement and implementation), and it's the same error. – Kevin Anderson Apr 30 '12 at 16:07
    
@Kevin: See my updated answer. It explains the real problem with your code. – Nawaz Apr 30 '12 at 16:19
2  
@Kevin This solution works for me; just add const to your debug_stream_info parameter and switch to std::ostream. Or as @CppLearner says, don't have a temporary object. – chrisaycock Apr 30 '12 at 16:19
    
So there's no way to enforce compile-time safety on this thing? Basically, I do need the methods of ostringstream, which means a cast at run-time. I'll give you credit though on that you nailed the cause of the error, rather than just "code something else!" like the other answer here is. – Kevin Anderson Apr 30 '12 at 16:25
1  
@Kevin: Obviously, the purpose of calling str("") is to make the stream buffer empty. If that is so, and if you're going to overload std::ostream instead, then you can try doing this: os.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf("", 0);. Along with it, maybe you need to do something more. Maybe, you need to set the seek position as well. – Nawaz Apr 30 '12 at 16:42

debug_stream_info(__LINE__, __FILE__, LOG_LEVEL); is creating unnamed object which is not returning anything hence error

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

class debug_stream_info
{
public:
    debug_stream_info(int errorLine, char *errorFile, int level)
        :m_errorLine(errorLine), m_errorFile(errorFile), m_logLevel(level)
    {
    }

    friend std::basic_ostringstream<char>& operator<<(std::basic_ostringstream<char>& os, debug_stream_info& debug_info);
    std::ostringstream& fun(std::ostringstream& os)
    {
        os<<"Ashish"<<endl;
        return os;
    }
private:
    int m_errorLine;
    std::string m_errorFile;
    int m_logLevel;

};

std::basic_ostringstream<char>& operator<<(std::basic_ostringstream<char>& os, debug_stream_info& debug_info)
{
    // Write the stream's contents to cpu_debug
    // Deleted custom logging function.  No errors here though

    // Clear the stream for re-use.
//    os.str("");
//    os.seekp(0);

    return os;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{

    std::ostringstream myout, test;
        myout << "hey there" << " and some more " << "Numbers!!: " << 435 << 54.2 << " that's good for numbers"
         << debug_stream_info(1, "/home/ashish/test", 1).fun(test);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually that works fine. I tried this: cout << "Try Unnamed: " << std::string("Unnamed!") << endl; and it works fine. You can make "temporary" objects like that with no problems. – Kevin Anderson Apr 30 '12 at 16:14
    
@Kevin You can pass a temporary std::string to operator<<() because it has const already, just like @Nawaz says. – chrisaycock Apr 30 '12 at 16:18
    
This is not the problem, or at least not the only one. (But you're right that his operator<< should take the new type by reference to const, and not reference to non-const.) – James Kanze Apr 30 '12 at 17:00

Nawaz has explained very clearly why you're getting the error. The usual solution in this case is to define your own stream type, unrelated to std::istream. Something along the lines of:

class DebugStream
{
    std::ostringstring* collector;

public:
    template <typename T>
    DebugStream& operator<<( T const& value )
    {
        if ( collector != NULL ) {
            *collector << value;
        }
        return *this;
    }
};

There are infinite variations on this; in your case, you could add a non-template member function for your type; more likely, you'd add a constructor which took the same arguments:

DebugStream( int lineNumber, std::string const& filename, int logLevel )
    : collector( isActive( logLevel ) ? new std::ostringstream : NULL )
{
    //  Initial insertion of lineNumber, filename, timestamp...
}

You can also add a destructor which atomically flushes the collected data to a file (or sends an email, or writes it to the system log, or whatever). (Be very careful about this. You don't want an exception to escape from the destructor, even if the logging fails.)

Finally, you might want to use a custom streambuf, rather than stringstream. Say one that keeps the allocated buffer from one instance to the next. And if you do this, rather than newing the stream each time, you might pick up an instance from a table, indexed by the log level (and initialized from a configuration file).

share|improve this answer
    
A neat idea that I'm giving you reputation from. I forgot that you can template the operator<< to exploit the fact that other classes are already overriding that operator for themselves. That was the main reason for using ostringstream: to get all the existing overrides. But I like your idea in general, and that may be the "General solution" for what I'm doing. – Kevin Anderson Apr 30 '12 at 17:11

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