Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been pondering this for a couple hours and I'm a little surprised at how challenging it is. I'm trying to initialize a static cache of reflection data for a given object from a base class that will be accessed from multiple threads. I'm having a hard time coming up with the correct pattern for initializing the cache.

My first thought was that I'll just initialize the static cache to null, check if it's null in the constructor, and then build and set it if it's not. I.e.:

class TestBase
{
  private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo> Cache;

  protected TestBase()
  {
    if(Cache == null)
    {
      ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo> cache =
        new ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo>();
      // Populate...
      Cache = cache;
    }
  }
}

This has a flaw in that if I construct another object while the first one is still populating the cache, I'll end up constructing two caches and the second will (presumably, though not always) overwrite the first. This is probably okay since they'll both be complete caches, but it seems hacky and I would hope we can do better.

So my second thought was to initialize the cache in a static constructor which only gets called once per AppDomain before any instances are created. StackOverflow seems to have several answers to similar questions that point in this direction. This seemed great until I realized that the static constructor won't have access to the reflection data for the derived type.

I could always synchronize access in the constructor to insure only one thread is creating/populating the cache and any other access while that's happening should block, but then I'm locking on every construction just to protect an operation that should only happen once. I don't like the performance implications of that.

What I have right now is a flag that is set using Interlocked.Exchange and a ManualResetEventSlim. It looks like this:

class TestBase
{
  private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo> Cache;
  private static volatile int BuildingCache = 0;
  private static ManualResetEventSlim CacheBuilt =
    new ManualResetEventSlim();

  protected TestBase()
  {
    if(Interlocked.Exchange(ref BuildingCache, 1) == 0)
    {
      Cache = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo>();
      // Populate...
      CacheBuilt.Set();
    }
    CacheBuilt.Wait();
  }
}

I suspect that there might already be an accepted, or at least known, way of doing this kind of thing - is this it? If not, is there a better way to synchronize the cache initialization? Note that the question is not about how to make cache access thread-safe, that can be assumed by using ConcurrentDictionary (or similar).

share|improve this question
    
I think even Dictionary<,> is thread safe for read-only get. So once your cache is ready, I don't even think ConcurrentDictionary is necessary. It is worth testing/looking into if you are interested –  payo Apr 30 '12 at 16:28
    
I justed tested the static ctor idea, and reflection on the derived parts works, what did you mean by "This seemed great until I realized that the static constructor won't have access to the reflection data for the derived type." –  payo Apr 30 '12 at 16:33
    
@payo - How did you get a reference to the Type instance for the derived type? this.GetType() isn't available (no "this") in the static constructor. Perhaps I wasn't clear enough - I don't know the derived types (and there are more than one). I.e., I can't do Type type = typeof(SomeDerivedType); in the base class static constructor to build the cache. –  somedave Apr 30 '12 at 16:38
    
You should create the dictionary outside of your constructor (private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo> Cache = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo>();) and check the Count to determine if you need to build the cache. –  JamieSee Apr 30 '12 at 16:46
    
@JamieSee - I actually thought about that, but my concern was that after the first item is added, any subsiquent instantiations will be allowed to proceed (since at least one item is in the cache), even if the additional cache items are still being added in the first constructor. This could lead to the following instances accessing the incomplete cache while it's still under construction. –  somedave Apr 30 '12 at 16:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the Lazy<T> class to lazily initialize something in a thread safe manner without writing your own plumbing.

If you want to eagerly cache reflection data, you'll need to use Assembly.GetTypes() to scan for compatible types (e.g. ones that are decorated with a certain attribute). For example:

var types = typeof(TestBase).Assembly.GetTypes().Where(type => --some condition--);
share|improve this answer
    
That's excellent - hadn't come across that class before. Does Lazy<T>.Value block while the value is being initialized (I assume it would have to)? If so, this looks perfect. –  somedave Apr 30 '12 at 17:08
1  
@somedave It blocks by default (although you can change this behavior). The first thread in initializes everything for all other threads. See Lazy Initialization on MSDN for more information on this and other lazy initialization concepts. –  Chris Hannon Apr 30 '12 at 17:13
    
@somedave: It always blocks until initialization completes. You can configure which thread(s) perform the initialization routines by using a constructor overload which accepts a LazyThreadSafetyMode enumeration. –  Allon Guralnek Apr 30 '12 at 17:28
    
@ChrisHannon: It always blocks, and that behavior is not configurable. Only who performs the initialization is configurable. Also, cool article, I wasn't aware of the other two classes mentioned there. –  Allon Guralnek Apr 30 '12 at 17:29
    
@AllonGuralnek If you pass in LazyThreadSafetyMode.PublicationOnly then all threads are allowed to race to initialize it but only the first returned value is stored. If by 'blocking' you mean "is this call performed in a synchronous manner" then yes, it does that at all times. If you mean "are other threads allowed to attempt initialization at the same time" then that depends on the parameter. –  Chris Hannon Apr 30 '12 at 19:09

You should create the dictionary outside of your constructor (private static ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo> Cache = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, PropertyInfo>();) and check the Count to determine if you need to build the cache. Then, if you use TryAdd to perform your add operations when building the cache, you shouldn't need to do any of your own thread locking at all.

You can handle the issue you brought up in your comment by simply using another property, IsCahceValid to indicate that caching has completed. Since you'd be using TryAdd you wouldn't even need to lock the variable since setting it to true at any point that you've had an initial completion works fine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.