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Doing the final checking before submit to apple store, and noticed one thing:

bundle identifier is et to com.overwaitea.${PRODUCT_NAME:rfc1034identifier},

Is that ok? I am asking because one of the apple store guideline says "Apps with placeholder text will be rejected"... I am wondering whether this counted as placeholder, particularly that rfc part...

Should I replace all the ${PRODUCT_NAME} etc with the actual name? or the building process will actually solve for me?

Update "bundle creater os type code" is ????, what should that be?

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1 Answer 1

This will replace ${PRODUCT_NAME:rfc1034identifier} with the product name as defined in the project configuration. But perhaps this is not what you want. Perhaps you created an application id in the iTunes developer portal which is not the name of the application. So you could simply replace ${PRODUCT_NAME:rfc1034identifier} by the id of your app.

But if you replace ${PRODUCT_NAME} then if later you wish to change the name of your product (which is not the identifier you chosen but the displayed name). You will have to replace anything you just replaced.

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That's it! But you would perhaps need to replace ${PRODUCT_NAME:rfc1034identifier} with your com.overwaitea.<your_id>. And for the other question : CFBundleSignature (String - iOS, Mac OS X) identifies the creator of the bundle and is analogous to the Mac OS 9 file creator code. The value for this key is a string containing a four-letter code that is specific to the bundle. For example, the signature for the TextEdit application is ttxt. –  Vaseltior Apr 30 '12 at 17:09
    
It is by default, and yes, you will not be rejected using this value. –  Vaseltior Apr 30 '12 at 18:31
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