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I am trying to write a javascript function to get the current browser width.

I found this one:

javascript:alert(document.body.offsetWidth);

But its problem that it fail if the body has width 100%

There is any other better function or a work around?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 197 down vote accepted

It's a pain in the ass. I recommend skipping the nonsense and using jQuery, which lets you just do $(window).width().

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2  
If I recalled correctly, jQuery has pulled much of dimensions into the core. Do you still need dimensions to do what you're suggesting? –  Nosredna Jun 24 '09 at 14:41
    
Turns out you don't. Which is awesome. Edited answer per. Thanks for the heads-up. –  chaos Jun 24 '09 at 14:43
6  
The $(window).width() support in jQuery is since version 1.2, in case it's relevant to anybody. –  chaos Jun 24 '09 at 14:44
9  
I've found that $(window).width() does not always return the same value as innerWidth / clientWidth as per the examples in the answer below. jQuery's version doesn't take browser scrollbars into account (in FF anyway). This caused me a lot of confusion with CSS @media queries appearing to trigger at the wrong width. Using native code seems to be more reliable as it takes the appearance of the scrollbars into account. –  Coder Jan 19 '13 at 10:17

Since all browsers behave differently, you'll need to test for values first, and then use the correct one. Here's a function that does this for you:

function getWidth() {
  if (self.innerHeight) {
    return self.innerWidth;
  }

  if (document.documentElement && document.documentElement.clientHeight) {
    return document.documentElement.clientWidth;
  }

  if (document.body) {
    return document.body.clientWidth;
  }
}

and similarly for height:

function getHeight() {
  if (self.innerHeight) {
    return self.innerHeight;
  }

  if (document.documentElement && document.documentElement.clientHeight) {
    return document.documentElement.clientHeight;
  }

  if (document.body) {
    return document.body.clientHeight;
  }
}

Call both of these in your scripts using getWidth() or getHeight(). If none of the browser's native properties are defined, it will return undefined.

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1  
Best answer because I dont have to include a 33k library for a simple redirect based on browser window width –  David Aguirre Jun 21 '14 at 17:21
    
This produces the right (or expected) results consistently compared to jQuery's implementation. –  unekwu Aug 17 '14 at 5:04
    
... each of these three shows some result and all results (widths) are different. For example with Google Chrome see self.innerWidth 423, document.documentElement.clientWidth 326 and document.body.clientWidth 406. In such case question: which is correct and which to use? For example i want to resize google map. 326 or 423 big difference. If width ~ 700, then see 759, 735, 742 (not so big difference) –  user2118559 Mar 13 at 4:00
var w = window.innerWidth;
var h = window.innerHeight;
var ow = window.outerWidth; //including toolbars and status bar etc.
var oh = window.outerHeight;

Both return integers and don't require jQuery. Cross-browser compatible.

I often find jQuery returns invalid values for width() and height()

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Here is a shorter version of the function presented above:

function getWidth() {
    if (self.innerWidth) {
       return self.innerWidth;
    }
    else if (document.documentElement && document.documentElement.clientHeight){
        return document.documentElement.clientWidth;
    }
    else if (document.body) {
        return document.body.clientWidth;
    }
    return 0;
}
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3  
Which fails to return a value if all the conditions are false. –  Mike C Jun 6 '12 at 16:39
2  
You don't need the elses :) –  Nick Nov 3 '13 at 6:19

From W3schools and its cross browser back to the dark ages of IE!

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

<p id="demo"></p>

<script>
var w = window.innerWidth
|| document.documentElement.clientWidth
|| document.body.clientWidth;

var h = window.innerHeight
|| document.documentElement.clientHeight
|| document.body.clientHeight;

var x = document.getElementById("demo");
x.innerHTML = "Browser inner window width: " + w + ", height: " + h + ".";

alert("Browser inner window width: " + w + ", height: " + h + ".");

</script>

</body>
</html>
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1  
do not trust W3Schools, which is full of errors. See w3fools.com –  Raptor Apr 1 at 10:08
    
The approach works beautifully and could be the accepted answer, because it is much shorter than any other solution (apart from using jQuery). –  Simon Steinberger May 8 at 23:07

Why nobody mentions matchMedia?

if (window.matchMedia("(min-width: 400px)").matches) {
  /* the viewport is at least 400 pixels wide */
} else {
  /* the viewport is less than 400 pixels wide */
}

Did not test that much, but tested with android default and android chrome browsers, desktop chrome, so far it looks like it works well.

Of course it does not return number value, but returns boolean - if matches or not, so might not exactly fit the question but that's what we want anyway and probably the author of question wants.

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