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We developed a Java RMI application with a centralized server and a client that is bundled in a jar package and downloaded to the host machine using Java WebStart. There is a potential for ITAR-related complications due to the caching of the client application on the host machine. We would like to allow users to execute the client application (jar) then remove it from their machine so that no remnants would be present if the users, for instance, took their laptops on travel for international business.

Is there any way to tell Java WebStart, "Do not cache this file."? I know this can be done on each client machine, but our organization is responsible for the ITAR security, not the users, so we need something that we build into the system to ensure no files are left laying around on the user's computers.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

I've never tried it, but you might look to the DownloadService method summary for methods starting with 'remove'.

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The asker said "I know this can be done on each client machine, but our organization is responsible for the ITAR security, not the users, so we need something that we build into the system to ensure no files are left laying around on the user's computers." –  Hitham S. AlQadheeb Apr 30 '12 at 17:22
    
@D3mon-1stVFW Noise removed. –  Andrew Thompson Apr 30 '12 at 19:15

Java Web Start will always launch the application from the cache, if possible, and it will simultaneously perform a background check with the server for updates. If updates are available, then it will notify the user, and launch the update versions the next time. This approach ensures fast startup time in the common case where there is no update, and also makes sure that an application can be launched offline.

For the 1.0 release, this behavior can be overwritten by adding the line javaws.cfg.forceUpdate=true in a client's javaws.cfg file. This will force Java Web Start to check for an update the first time. Unfortunately though, setting this flag will cause offline mode to not work properly.

In a future release of Java Web Start, we expect to change the behavior of the update checking to immediatly launch the newer version of the application, if an update is available, while still preserving offline launching

  1. Try javaws.cfg.forceUpdate=false

  2. You can try and delete the cache folder on the client machine. Check http://stackoverflow.com/a/1517367/643500

  3. You can also modify the jnlp to customize managing the cache. Read http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/javaws/developersguide/examples.html

import javax.jnlp.*;

    DownloadService ds; 

    try { 
        ds = (DownloadService)ServiceManager.lookup("javax.jnlp.DownloadService"); 
    } catch (UnavailableServiceException e) { 
        ds = null; 
    } 

    if (ds != null) { 

        try { 
            // determine if a particular resource is cached
            URL url = 
                    new URL("http://java.sun.com/products/javawebstart/lib/draw.jar"); 
            boolean cached = ds.isResourceCached(url, "1.0"); 
            // remove the resource from the cache 
            if (cached) { 
                ds.removeResource(url, "1.0"); 
            } 
            // reload the resource into the cache 
            DownloadServiceListener dsl = ds.getDefaultProgressWindow(); 
            ds.loadResource(url, "1.0", dsl); 
        } catch (Exception e) { 
            e.printStackTrace(); 
        } 
    } 
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