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I am using a rtos library for the mbed platform. I want to be able to jump into the thread, increment a certain value at a constant rate, then close the thread when it is over. The problem is that a method implementing the Thread from the mbed RTOS library can only take a const void * argument. This would not be a big deal except I need to send it an array of float values, one of those values being a pointer to the value I need to increment ( *joint ), while the others can simply be const that control the range and speed of the increment. I thought I had it under control and found a neat bit of code on here to cast properly, but I still keep coming up with 0 values: //float (*vals)[4] = (float (*)[4])args;

Here is the code, cut down to just the two functions that participate in the thread work.

void increment( void const *args ) { //float *joint, float inc, float target, int speed ) 
    //float (*vals)[4] = (float (*)[4])args;
    float *vals = (float* )args;

    // joint is the outside value I want to increment
    float *joint  = &vals[0];
    float inc    = vals[1];
    float target = vals[2];
    int   speed  = (int)vals[3];
    float start = 0.5;


    if( inc < 0 ) 
        for( *joint = start; *joint > target; *joint+=inc ) {
             wait( 0.1 / speed );
        }
    }


void thread_inc( float *joint, float inc, float target, int speed ){
    float args[4] = { *joint, inc, target, (float)speed };
    //Thread move( increment, args );
    Thread move( increment, &args );
    return;
}

Thank you in advance for anything that points me in the right direction!

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5 Answers 5

Instead of trying to pass a list of args through the void*, I would recommend defining a struct for your Thread args that has a field for each arg. Fill it out and then pass the address of the struct as the void*.

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Stylistically I would recommend using a structure to pass this information to your thread. This will make your code more readable and clean up the syntax somewhat.

struct thread_args {
   float * joint;
   float inc;
   float target;
   int speed;
};
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While I agree that this style would be much preferred, it doesn't really answer the question. –  Kaiged Apr 30 '12 at 17:13

I'm absolutely stealing this from jlunavtgrad, Pat, and Burton Samograd. I feel like all three of their answers truly answer the OP.

  1. This is much better managed with a struct representing the arguments to be passed to the new thread context.

  2. The args array is on the stack and bounded by the scope of thread_inc. By replacing it with a struct, you still aren't getting around the scoping issues involved here. So, the arguments (in whatever form) need to be allocated in a manner that another thread context can use them properly -- this can be done with a global or on the heap.

  3. The float *joint argument of thread_inc is dereferenced and the value is used to populate the arguments. This doesn't seem to be the behavior desired, as only the copied value in the argument array will be modified.

The suggested modifications in the code:

struct thread_args {
  float * joint;
  float inc;
  float target;
  int speed;
};


void increment( void const *args ) {
  thread_args* threadArgs = static_cast<thread_args*>( args );

  float *joint  = threadArgs->joint;
  float inc    = threadArgs->inc;
  float target = threadArgs->target;
  int   speed  = threadArgs->speed;
  float start = 0.5;

  if( inc < 0 ){ 
    for( *joint = start; *joint > target; *joint+=inc ) {
       wait( 0.1 / speed );
    }
  }

  delete threadArgs;
}

void thread_inc( float *joint, float inc, float target, int speed ){
  thread_args* threadArgs = new thread_args;
  threadArgs->joint = joint;
  threadArgs->inc = inc;
  threadArgs->target = target;
  threadArgs->speed = speed;

  //Thread move( increment, args );
  Thread move( increment, threadArgs );
  return;
}

A final suggestion related to this solution, is not to use new and delete in their raw forms, but use a smart pointer of sorts, like shared_ptr.

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You are creating the args array on the stack, so when you create the thread it is out of scope when the function returns. You should allocate the args array using new/malloc, initialize it and then pass it into the move thread. When the move thread is done you can free the array. Another option is to create the array that is passed to thread_inc in a calling function.

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There seem to be two, equally important fixes to this, including this answer and Pat's. –  Kaiged Apr 30 '12 at 17:15

You're dereferencing the *joint when passing it to the increment function, so that function can never update that value.

Try this:

void increment( void const *args ) { //float *joint, float inc, float target, int speed ) 
    //float (*vals)[4] = (float (*)[4])args;
    float *vals = (float* )args;

    // joint is the outside value I want to increment
    float *joint  = (float *)vals[0];
    float inc    = vals[1];
    float target = vals[2];
    int   speed  = (int)vals[3];
    float start = 0.5;


    if( inc < 0 ) 
        for( *joint = start; *joint > target; *joint+=inc ) {
             wait( 0.1 / speed );
        }
    }


void thread_inc( float *joint, float inc, float target, int speed ){
    float args[4] = { (float)joint, inc, target, (float)speed };
    //Thread move( increment, args );
    Thread move( increment, &args );
    return;
}
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Let's hope he's not a 64 bit system. Floats are 32 bits. As suggested below a struct would be a much better idea. –  Burton Samograd Apr 30 '12 at 17:21

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