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Chalk this up to things I knew 25 years ago, and forgot....

I have log output from Windows Event Log, and don't have control over the timestamp format (if I did, I'd choose something sensible like YYYYMMDD HH24MMSS so it sorts easily when treated as a string.
I'm sure there's an easy way to do this with sed or some sort parameter. Does anyone have a quick solution for this?

Sample Data:

SERVER01,1/1/2013 12:00:01 AM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,4/11/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO

Desired Order:

SERVER01,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,4/11/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,1/1/2013 12:00:01 AM,8,FOO,TOO

Re-formatting the timestamp is OK, desirable even. I just don't know how. This needs to run on windows, and I have Cygwin available (and am already using it for some grep filtering on this same file).

share|improve this question
    
Chris, can you add the version of Windows that is producing the event logs? –  Rob Kielty May 3 '12 at 7:49
    
Rob, it's Server2003 –  Chris Thornton May 3 '12 at 19:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+100

Awk definitely comes with cygwin, and it could move the date to a sortable format to the front of the line (I'm quit the newbie to awk, so this is ugly I'm sure but it works), so then you can just cat the log into this script then into a simple sort

#! /bin/awk -f
BEGIN {
   FS=",";
}
{
   linedate=$2;
   split(linedate,datetime," ");
   split(datetime[1],datepieces,"/");
   date=sprintf( "%d/%02d/%02d", datepieces[3], datepieces[1], datepieces[2]);
   split(datetime[2],timepieces,":");
   time=sprintf( "%02d:%02d:%02d", timepieces[1], timepieces[2], timepieces[3] );
   print date " " time " " datetime[3] "," $1 "," $3 "," $4 "," $5;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is working, nice! –  Chris Thornton May 8 '12 at 16:28

Here's a Perl script that prepends a sortable timestamp to each line:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

while (<>) {
    my $timestamp = (split /,/)[1];
    my($mon, $mday, $year, $hour, $min, $sec, $ampm) =
        $timestamp =~ m{^(\d+)/(\d+)/(\d+)\s+(\d+):(\d+):(\d+)\s+(AM|PM)};
    die "Can't parse timestamp on line $.\n" if not defined $ampm;
    if ($ampm eq 'AM') {
        $hour = 0 if $hour == 12;
    }
    else {
        $hour += 12 if $hour != 12;
    }

    printf "%04d-%02d-%02d %02d:%02d:%02d,%s",
           $year, $mday, $mon, $hour, $min, $sec, $_;
}

For your sample data, it produces the following output:

2013-01-01 00:00:01,SERVER01,1/1/2013 12:00:01 AM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-10-04 16:43:06,SERVER01,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-11-04 16:43:06,SERVER01,4/11/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-09-04 16:43:06,SERVER01,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-31-12 23:59:59,SERVER02,12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-10-04 16:43:06,SERVER02,4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
2012-09-04 16:43:06,SERVER02,4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO

To sort the sample data by date, assuming that the above Perl script is foo.pl:

./foo.pl in.txt | sort | sed 's/^[^,]*,//'

This produces output identical to the specified output in your question.

If you prefer, a small tweak to the Perl script lets you avoid the sort and sed commands, at the expense of storing, modifying, and sorting the entire file in memory, which could be a problem for very large inputs:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my @lines = ();

while (<>) {
    my $timestamp = (split /,/)[1];
    my($mon, $mday, $year, $hour, $min, $sec, $ampm) =
        $timestamp =~ m{^(\d+)/(\d+)/(\d+)\s+(\d+):(\d+):(\d+)\s+(AM|PM)};
    die "Can't parse timestamp on line $.\n" if not defined $ampm;
    if ($ampm eq 'AM') {
        $hour = 0 if $hour == 12;
    }
    else {
        $hour += 12 if $hour != 12;
    }

    push @lines, sprintf "%04d-%02d-%02d %02d:%02d:%02d,%s",
                         $year, $mday, $mon, $hour, $min, $sec, $_;
}

@lines = sort @lines;
foreach (@lines) {
    s/^[^,]*,//;
}
print @lines;
share|improve this answer
    
Looks nice, but I need to install perl for cygwin? –  Chris Thornton May 3 '12 at 12:57
    
@ChrisThornton: Yes, it's easy enough to do, just re-run setup.exe and select perl. It will figure out all the dependencies. I don't remember, isn't Perl installed by default? Try perl --version from a shell prompt. –  Keith Thompson May 3 '12 at 21:06

I had to do something like this -- I had multiple log files with log4j timestamp that needed to be merged.

The solution I settled on was to use gawk to covert the timestamp to milliseconds-from-epoch and prefix all lines with that. Using sort was straightforward after that.

I converted to above format because I also wanted to do some arithmetic on the t9imestamp values. You might be able to take a shortcut and convert to yymmddXhhmmss in sed. The X is for am/pm use 0 for am and 1 for pm

On further thought, you too would be better off using gawk, not sed, so that you can use printf to get zero-padded numbers.

share|improve this answer

Just try this unix command.

I have done for the time stamp part only.

Input

1/1/2013 12:00:01 AM
4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM
4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM
12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM
4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM
4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM

Unix Command

$>sort -t "/"  -k 1.8,1.4 Input| sort -t ":" -r -k 1 -k 2.1,2.2 -k 3.1,3.2 | sort -t " " -r -k 3.1

Output

4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM
4/9/2012 4:43:06 PM
4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM
4/10/2012 4:43:06 PM
12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM
1/1/2013 12:00:01 AM

You can modify the script as per your requirement.

share|improve this answer

Chris,

You may need to play around with the below code provided, specifically have a look at the sort command.

The awk script that I wrote sanitises the Windows Server 2003 "timestamp" so that single digits are pre padded with zeros. It is very easy to alter the format of the resultant sane timestamp.

Should work with a default cygwin install.

Let me know what you think, may need some tweeking which I would be happy to do based on your feedback.

Rob

$ gawk -f foo.awk event_log.txt | sort  -n -k2
SERVER01,04/09/2012 04:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,04/10/2012 04:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,04/11/2012 04:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,04/09/2012 04:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,04/10/2012 04:43:06 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER02,12/31/2012 11:59:59 PM,8,FOO,TOO
SERVER01,01/01/2013 12:00:01 AM,8,FOO,TOO

Where foo.awk is

BEGIN { FS = "," }
{ print $1"," prepadDate($2) "," $3 "," $4 "," $5 }

#
# Returnes a useful timestamp given the timestamp received in event logs on Windows Server 2003
#
function prepadDate(winSrvr2003ts) {

        padded_day = ""
        padded_month = ""
        year = ""

        padded_date = ""
        split(winSrvr2003ts,numbers," ")

        split(numbers[1], date, "/")
        split(numbers[2], time, ":")
        antePostMeridian = numbers[3]

        padded_day = prePadAZero(date[1])
        padded_month = prePadAZero(date[2])
        year = date[3]
        padded_hour = prePadAZero(time[1])
        minute = time[2]
        seconds = time[3]

        #
        # Alter the return statememnt to format the timestamp according to your needs
        # rememebering that string concatenation in gawk is simply a space.
        #
        return padded_day "/" padded_month "/" year " " padded_hour ":" minute ":" seconds " " antePostMeridian
}

#
# Prepend a zero to number if it is a single digit
#
function prePadAZero(number){

        if (length(number) == 1)
                padded = "0" number
        else
                padded = number

        return padded
}
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