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In C++, an object's destructor is called at the closing "}" for the block it was created in, right? So this means that if I have:

while(some_condition)
{
    SomeClass some_object;
    some_object.someFunction();
    some_variable = some_object.some_member;
}

Then the destructor for the object created in one iteration of the loop will be called at the end of the loop before another object is created, correct?

Thanks.

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possible duplicate of lifetime of declaration within a loop –  Bo Persson Apr 30 '12 at 18:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Yes.

But you could have tested it yourself. This is a language feature that compilers are unlikely to get wrong.

#include <iostream>

struct S {
  S() { std::cout << "S::S()\n"; }
  ~S() { std::cout << "S::~S()\n"; }
};

int main () {
  int i = 10;
  while(i--) {
    S s;
  }
}
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Thank you much. –  Jenny Shoars Apr 30 '12 at 17:45
    
Short, sweet, correct. == +1 –  duffymo Apr 30 '12 at 17:46
    
I'll accept your answer in a bit once the time restriction on accepting allows me to. –  Jenny Shoars Apr 30 '12 at 17:46
    
I don't know, compilers are really good at getting things wrong... :) +1 –  Seth Carnegie Apr 30 '12 at 17:50

The observable behaviour is that it's called each iteration.

The usual rules about optimisations still apply though. If the compiler is smart and the object simple then compiler can do anything it likes that still produces the correct behaviour, e.g.:

#include <iostream>

struct foo {
  int i;
  foo() : i (-1) {}
  ~foo() { i = 1; }
};

int main() {
  int i = 10;
  while (--i) {
    foo f;
    std::cout << f.i;
  }
}

Compiles to:

.Ltmp5:
        .cfi_def_cfa_register %rbp
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        movl    $_ZSt4cout, %edi
        movl    $-1, %esi
        callq   _ZNSolsEi
        xorl    %eax, %eax
        popq    %rbp
        ret

I.e. unrolled and no sign of that destructor in there (although the observable behaviour is still the same).

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3  
The code that gets generated on my system if the member is a bit more complex than just an int and varies depending on the loop counter is quite interesting - basically you end up with the memory for each individual instantiation of foo living inside the binary, pre-computed. –  Flexo Apr 30 '12 at 18:06

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