Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i`m looking forward to free memory of a class obj. taking the following example:

class Foo{
  private:
     int a;
  public:
     Foo();
     ~Foo();
};

Foo::Foo(){
    this a = a;
}

Foo::~Foo(){
    delete a; //not working required pointer
    delete *a; // error: a ain't a pointer....
}
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne May 2 '12 at 14:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is the question? –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 17:51
1  
Aside: The line this a = a won't compile. –  Robᵩ Apr 30 '12 at 17:52
1  
There's no new, so why do you think there should be a delete? –  ildjarn Apr 30 '12 at 17:52
    
I understood some concept wrong... but i have it clear now. –  Bogdan Maier Apr 30 '12 at 17:54
    
@OliCharlesworth if you read comment in code you will see the problem. –  Bogdan Maier Apr 30 '12 at 17:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You don't have to destroy the members of your class; they are destroyed automatically.

You do have to destroy any objects that you create "by hand". To put it simply, for every new, there must be exactly one delete; for every new [] there must be exactly one delete[].

share|improve this answer
    
thank you. I understand now. –  Bogdan Maier Apr 30 '12 at 17:52

This answer is pretty simple: a is not pointer, so you don't have to manage its memory, it will be done automatically. Moreover, your destructor then becomes useless and you can delete it.

share|improve this answer

a is an int, which is stored by value. You don't need to free it, it resides in automatic storage and is deallocated when the containing object of which it is a member is deallocated.

As Rob(small lolipop) says, you don't ever need to delete things that weren't created with new.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.