Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

My query looks like this:

INSERT INTO table1 (lfd, somedata)
select (select max(lfd) + 1 from table1), somedata from table2

Table2 has multiple rows. So I want multiple rows inserted into table1. That works, but lfd is set to the same number for all inserted rows.

So if max(ldf) + 1 is "2" for the first row inserted, it's "2" for all the following rows too. That's incorrect, because max(lfd) + 1 for the next row should return "3" of course.

How do I tell mysql to reevaluate the subquery for each insert?

I can't touch the table structures because I migrate data from one php-gallery into a second different php-gallery. The structure of the tables is under the control of the applications.

In Oracle I would simply define a sequence and select the squeencename.nextval in the subselect. - I am pretty sure that would work, but mysql does not offer sequences as far as I know, right?

share|improve this question
    
same as the answer, same problem: i can't touch the table sctructure. – JPS Apr 30 '12 at 19:28
    
You could face concurrency issues doing this any other way (unless you lock the table) - is there the possibility that other users/connections might also be inserting new records into table1 table whilst your query is running? – eggyal Apr 30 '12 at 19:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this once:

SELECT MAX(lfd) + 1 INTO @i FROM table1;

INSERT INTO table1 (lfd,col1,...)
SELECT @i:=@i+1,somedata,... FROM SomeTable;

Essentially this would just use a variable as a sequence, initializing it with the current maximum id from the table.

Note that you might have concurrency issues here if rows are inserted into table1 while this query is running.

share|improve this answer

Just define lfd to be an autoincrement column. Then you won't have to bother with select max(...) ....

Here's a different way to do it:

insert into table1 (lfd, somedata)
select 
  (
    select count(*) + (select count(*) from table1) 
    from table2 l
    where l.lfd <= r.lfd
  ),
  r.somedata
from table2 r;

How this works:

  1. ranks the rows in table2 from 1 to n (where n is the number of rows in table2)
  2. adds the initial max(lfd) to the ranks so the values will be unique

Caveats: this is an n**2 query, so if you have a big data set this could take a while.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tip. Sadly I can't touch the table structures because I migrate data from one php-gallery into a second different php-gallery. The structure of the tables is under the control of the applications. – JPS Apr 30 '12 at 19:27
    
@JPS I've updated my answer. Works for me! – Matt Fenwick Apr 30 '12 at 19:50
    
@MattFenwick: My bad, I thought the select .. from table1 subquery would fluff it up. What about concurrency issues though, if other concurrent inserts are taking place into table1? Might result in collisions... – eggyal Apr 30 '12 at 19:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.