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I am trying to build a simple little template parser for self-learning purposes.

How do I build something "modular" and share data across it? The data doesn't need to be accessible from outside, it's just internal data. Here's what I have:

# template_parser.rb
module TemplateParser
  attr_accessor :html
  attr_accessor :test_value

  class Base
    def initialize(html)
      @html = html
      @test_value = "foo"
    end

    def parse!
      @html.css('a').each do |node|
        ::TemplateParser::Tag:ATag.substitute! node
      end
    end
  end
end

# template_parser/tag/a_tag.rb
module TemplateParser
  module Tag
    class ATag
      def self.substitute!(node)
        # I want to access +test_value+ from +TemplateParser+
        node = @test_value # => nil
      end
    end
  end
end

Edit based on Phrogz' comment
I am currently thinking about something like:

p = TemplateParser.new(html, *args) # or TemplateParser::Base.new(html, *args)
p.append_css(file_or_string)
parsed_html = p.parse!

There shouldn't be much exposed methods because the parser should solve a non-general problem and is not portable. At least not at this early stage. What I've tried is to peek a bit from Nokogiri about the structure.

share|improve this question
1  
In addition to showing what you have (which is great) it would be even better if you showed what you think the user-facing code should look like. What methods and classes would you like to expose (and why)? – Phrogz Apr 30 '12 at 19:33
    
Added my thinkings about the user-facing code. – pduersteler May 1 '12 at 6:30
up vote 2 down vote accepted

With the example code you've given, I'd recommend using composition to pass in an instance of TemplateParser::Base to the parse! method like so:

# in TemplateParser::Base#parse!
::TemplateParser::Tag::ATag.substitute! node, self

# TemplateParser::Tag::ATag
def self.substitute!(node, obj)
  node = obj.test_value
end

You will also need to move the attr_accessor calls into the Base class for this to work.

module TemplateParser
  class Base
    attr_accessor :html
    attr_accessor :test_value
    # ...
  end
end

Any other way I can think of right now of accessing test_value will be fairly convoluted considering the fact that parse! is a class method trying to access a different class instance's attribute.

The above assumes @test_value needs to be unique per TemplateParser::Base instance. If that's not the case, you could simplify the process by using a class or module instance variable.

module TemplateParser
  class Base
    @test_value = "foo"
    class << self
      attr_accessor :test_value
    end
    # ...
  end
end

# OR

module TemplateParser
  @test_value = "foo"
  class << self
    attr_accessor :test_value
  end
  class Base
    # ...
  end
end

Then set or retrieve the value with TemplateParser::Base.test_value OR TemplateParser.test_value depending on implementation.

Also, to perhaps state the obvious, I'm assuming your pseudo-code you've included here doesn't accurately reflect your real application code. If it does, then the substitute! method is a very round about way to achieve simple assignment. Just use node = test_value inside TemplateParser::Base#parse! and skip the round trip. I'm sure you know this, but it seemed worth mentioning at least...

share|improve this answer
    
many thanks for your detailed example and exclamation. The code I submitted is actually the same that I wanted to get up and running, so not really a pseudo thing. – pduersteler May 2 '12 at 11:39

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