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Ok so, I have a read method that is reading the values in correctly (all 7000), (hand written 15 values as a tree structure), doesn't create any errors.

However, when it comes to the output of the binary tree I am using the method as stated on several websites.

The error I am getting is a stack overflow, and I am assuming its due to the recursive calls and never breaking out, But I have no idea why this isn't working.

Any help is appreciated, thanks.

Code Listed Below:

// Read
void BinaryTreeStorage::read(ifstream& _fin)
{
        // Get first line with number of names in it
        string numberOfNamesString;
        getline(_fin, numberOfNamesString);

        // Loop through all the names
        string line;
        int num = 0;
        while (!_fin.eof())
        {
                getline(_fin, line);
                if (line != "")
                {
                        // Insert Value Here
                        if (root != NULL)
                        {
                                insert(line, root);
                        }
                        else
                        {
                                insert(line);
                        }
                }
        }
}

// Write
void BinaryTreeStorage::write(ofstream& _out) const
{
        inorderPrint(_out, root);
}

// inorderPrint
void BinaryTreeStorage::inorderPrint(ofstream& _out, node *_root) const
{
        if (_root != NULL)
        {
                // Inorder
                inorderPrint(_out, root->left);
                _out << root->nodeValue;
                cout << root->nodeValue << " ";
                inorderPrint(_out, root->right);
        }
}

// Insert if root is null
void BinaryTreeStorage::insert(string _nodeValueIn)
{
    if(root!=NULL)
        insert(_nodeValueIn, root);
    else
    {
        root=new node;
        root->nodeValue=_nodeValueIn;
        root->left=NULL;
        root->right=NULL;
    }
}

// Insert when root is not null
void BinaryTreeStorage::insert(string _nodeValueIn, node *leaf)
{
    if(_nodeValueIn< leaf->nodeValue)
    {
        if(leaf->left!=NULL)
            insert(_nodeValueIn, leaf->left);
        else
        {
            leaf->left=new node;
            leaf->left->nodeValue=_nodeValueIn;
            leaf->left->left=NULL;    //Sets the left child of the child node to null
            leaf->left->right=NULL;   //Sets the right child of the child node to null
        }  
  }
  else if(_nodeValueIn>=leaf->nodeValue)
  {
        if(leaf->right!=NULL)
            insert(_nodeValueIn, leaf->right);
        else
        {
            leaf->right=new node;
            leaf->right->nodeValue=_nodeValueIn;
            leaf->right->left=NULL;  //Sets the left child of the child node to null
            leaf->right->right=NULL; //Sets the right child of the child node to null
        }
    }
}
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1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow! Asking strangers to spot errors in your code by inspection is not productive. You should identify (or at least isolate) the problem by using a debugger or print statements, and then come back with a more specific question (once you've narrowed it down to a 10-line test-case). –  Oliver Charlesworth Apr 30 '12 at 20:17
    
in the last function, insert, a lot of it doesn't make sense. I can see a lot of potential for infinite recursion. However I'm not tracing the whole thing, that's what a debugger is for. Also, you should use string.empty() to check if an std::string is empty –  std''OrgnlDave Apr 30 '12 at 21:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
void BinaryTreeStorage::inorderPrint(ofstream& _out, node *_root) const
{
        if (_root != NULL)
        {
                // Inorder
                inorderPrint(_out, root->left);

In the above code, I can see _root defined but you're using root in your call (last line above). I think that is causing the infinite loop.

share|improve this answer
    
That has fixed it, thanks –  MitchellT Apr 30 '12 at 21:12
    
If this answered your problem please accept it. –  deebee Apr 30 '12 at 21:28
    
Sorry I'm new to this forum –  MitchellT Apr 30 '12 at 21:31
    
ah nvm, found it –  MitchellT Apr 30 '12 at 21:38

You have a bug in BinaryTreeStorage::inorderPrint, your param _root is not used where intended: You always loop on root instead.

hint: Avoid using similar names!

hint: Avoid using std to avoid bugs, unless you write std:: too often in nested templates.

hint: Do not use _ at the beginning or end of names.

hint: Do not compare with NULL: Write if(n) instead of if(n!=NULL).

hint: Do not nest blocks when not needed:

void BinaryTreeStorage::inorderPrint(std::ofstream& out, node *n) const
{
    if(!n) return;

    inorderPrint(out, n->left);
    out << n->nodeValue; // no separator??
    std::cout << n->nodeValue << " ";
    inorderPrint(out, n->right);
}
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When you constructed your tree nodes did you ensure that the left and right pointers are initialized to NULL?

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Yes, the left and right are set to NULL Updated Code accordingly. –  MitchellT Apr 30 '12 at 20:22
    
Then walk through your insert logic by hand. –  John Percival Hackworth Apr 30 '12 at 20:25

The depth of the call tree of inorderPrint is the same as the depth of the tree itself. It looks like you don't try to keep the tree balanced, so the depth can get as large as the size of the tree.

There are a few ways of fixing this. You can make sure that the tree always remains balanced so that the depth grows logarithmically with the size of the tree. Or you can make the tree threaded, which lets you visit the nodes iteratively.

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