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I have this following table (I'm thinking of putting this as a datatable, but I'm flexible):

ID(int)   Branch(string)   Department(string)   Available(Boolean)

 101          North           Sales               True
 101          North           Marketing           False
 102          North           Security            True
 103          South           Sales               True
 ...          ...             ...                 ...

I want to be able to query Available through [ID][Branch][Department]

So something like [101]["North"]["Marketing"] would give me False, or at least tell me whether a row containing [101]["North"]["Marketing"] exists or not in the table.

What's the most efficient way to go about this? Feel free to suggest some other structure if you think it's more efficient than a datatable

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1  
Where are you storing the data? In memory, or on a remote database? –  Randolpho Apr 30 '12 at 20:22
    
I should add that it's not going to be in some database. It'll just be in memory as a small lookup table. There's probably not going to be more than 20 rows. –  kei Apr 30 '12 at 20:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can set the DataTable's PrimaryKey to be the first 3 columns then use DataTable's Rows.Find(101, "North", "Marketing") to fish out the row or get null if it doesn't exist!

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You can use DataTable's Select method. Like

datatable.Select("ID = 101 AND Branch='North' AND Department = 'Marketing'"); 
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Brilliant! That works! –  kei Apr 30 '12 at 20:31

I should add that it's not going to be in some database. It'll just be in memory as a small lookup table. There's probably not going to be more than 20 rows.

In that case, the most efficient method, both for performance and memory footprint, would be to use an enumeration for Branch and Department and to use your triple-nested array approach.

That having been said, both it and simple datatable would be a maintenance nightmare. I would suggest you consider well-defined types.

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If it's a small amount of data in memory, why not use LINQ to objects and make custom business objects for your data? It would be more efficient than a DataTable.

public class Branch
{
  public int ID {get;set;}
  public string BranchName {get;set;}
  public string Department {get;set;}
  public bool Available {get;set;}
}

public bool BranchExists(int id, string branch, string dept)
{
   //assume "Branches" is your in-memory list
   return Branches.Any(b => b.id == id && b.BranchName == branch && b.Department == dept);
}
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