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Using only .net 3.5 i have sample class:

public class Table1
{
   public IEnumerable<Table2> Items { get; set; }
}

Its a kind of ORM and i need materialize collection by a lazy computed type

I trying find way to assign instance to property Items, for example by List<Table2>

When i create instance by Activator, it returns object, which i cant cast to needed type

var t = typeof(List<>);
var gt = t.MakeGenericType(typeof(Table2));
object instance = Activator.CreateInstance(gt);

var table1 = new Table1();
table1.Items = instance; //canot use cast here

And is problem to assign 'object' variable to typed IEnumerable

How it works in most OR-mapers?

Can i use Reflection.Emit to generate concrete type?
Can i use Castle/Linfu?

EDIT:

I canot use any direct cast, because it requires reference Table2 which is i cannot harcode

SOLUTION:

After some time i found solution by myself. It need to use reflection for set instance:

var table1 = new Table1();
var table1Type = typeof(Table1);
var prop = table1Type.GetProperty("Items");
prop.SetValue(table1, instance, null);
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2  
"which i cant cast to needed type" - why not? –  Austin Salonen Apr 30 '12 at 21:09
    
Austin Salonen, see edit –  devi May 1 '12 at 9:13

2 Answers 2

I think you're just missing a simple cast:

instead of:

table1.Items = instance;

make it:

table1.Items = instance as IEnumerable<Table2>;
share|improve this answer
    
I canot use any direct cast, because it requires reference Table2 which is i cannot harcode –  devi May 1 '12 at 9:13
    
Well can you change the declaration of the Items property in Table1 to an object then? –  Steve Danner May 1 '12 at 12:50

If you know you want a List why can't you just use new List<Table2>()? Generally you only use Activator.CreateInstance when the type isn't known until runtime, often using a string-based configuration value.

All you need to do, though, is explicitly cast instance to either IEnumerable<Table2> or List<Table2>, either one should work:

table1.Items = (IEnumerable<Table2>) instance;
share|improve this answer
    
I canot use any direct cast, because it requires reference Table2 which is i cannot harcode –  devi May 1 '12 at 9:13
    
@devi You have a reference to Table2 in your code: var gt = t.MakeGenericType(typeof(Table2)); –  Joel C May 1 '12 at 20:09
    
its just sample, in my code i use GetType() instead of typeof() and types not referenced –  devi May 2 '12 at 13:04

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