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This is my first question ever on SO and I'm happy to take any tips on improving. Be gentle :)

To increase maintainability, I am trying to keep CSS, JS and HTML all together in the same file. This becomes difficult with include files, or macros, etc. The final output template.render() should grab all that CSS and JS, and place it at the top and bottom of the base HTML template.

Example should explain what I mean:

base.html

<html>
<head>
  <style>
    {{ print_css() }}
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  {% include 'bolded_text.html' %}
  <script>
    {{ print_js() }}
  </script>
</body>
</html>

bolded_text.html

{# this doesn't need to be a filter. It could be a block, or anything else that would make this work #}
{% filter add_css %}
   strong {
     background: #ccc;
   }
{% endfilter %}
<strong>Bolded text</strong>
{% filter add_js %}
   alert('javascript included!');
{% endfilter %}

Output would of course be:

<html>
<head>
  <style>
    strong {
      background: #ccc;
    }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  {% include 'bolded_text.html' %}
  <script>
    alert('javascript included!')
  </script>
</body>
</html>

Predictably, the problem is that print_css() outputs nothing.

I tried doing this with context filters, where add_js and add_css append to a variable in the context, and then print_css and print_js output that variable. This works nicely and simply for JavaScript, since the print statement follows all the filters.

However, I can't think of a way to make it work with CSS. If I could make the print_css() call lazy, or swap in the output in the jinja2 AST somehow, that might work. I'm trying to avoid hacky string manipulation (such as outputting the CSS at the bottom and then using regexes to move it to the top).

I figured there might be a way to do this elegantly and my experience with jinja2's low-level API is limited.

Any help is much appreciated, thanks!

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1 Answer

Macros will do that, but I don't see the point why you wouldn't use StyleSheets, this enables the browser a way better caching and it's also easier to maintain.

EDIT:

Example:

{% macro generate_css(strong_bg='#ccc', additional_options=None) -%}
    strong {
        background: {{ strong_bg }};
    }
{%- endmacro %}

<head>
  <style>
    {{ generate_css() }}
  </style>
</head>
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure how you mean to do this with macros? I totally agree about caching. Easier to maintain is debatable. I suppose one approach would be to build a stylesheet and insert it into the final template. –  Paul C May 1 '12 at 21:02
    
I edited the answer, I hope this helps! –  dav1d May 2 '12 at 12:08
    
Hm, thanks for the edit. This probably won't work, since I won't be able to overwrite the macro from the include. Not before it is already called and renders, at least. –  Paul C May 2 '12 at 23:10
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