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We are building a system that is, effectively, an email/calendar/contact client.

Users will provide us with their email address password (or other auth, eg oauth) and we will connect to their underlying email system.

"underlying systems" include:

  • Microsoft Exchange / Office365
  • GMail
  • Yahoo Mail
  • Apple email
  • Generic IMAP

Each of these systems have subtle (and not so subtle) differences in their APIs, especially to access calendar & contact data. Thus we need to know what provider the user is using.

But we would rather not ASK the user. We would like to figure it out (and at, least reduce the choices) automatically.

I've looked around for something that already implements this but have not found anything. I know it's mostly possible because Windows Phone does it pretty well (just enter username/pw and it does the right thing).

Before I dive in and start writing my own I want to ensure I'm not wasting my time if someone's already done it in an excellent way.

Know of anything like this? For this project prefer C#/.NET.

[EDIT: Adding potential algo]

Potential Algorithm:

  • Given email address & password
    • Extract domain name from email address
    • Try Exchange autodiscover. If successful done.
    • Use DNS MX records to find smtp host.
      • Do SMTP EHLO
      • Gmail responds with "250-mx.google.com at your service"
        • So if we see a "google.com" we are done.
      • Yahoo responds with 250-mta1257.mail.sk1.yahoo.com
        • So if we see a "yahoo.com" in the response we are done.
      • Apple responds with 250-xxxxxx-mac.com
        • So if we see a "mac.com" in the response we are done.
      • If none of the above
        • IMAP?
          • ...

[EDIT: 5/18] I built a prototype that uses methods that don't require auth (e.g. just MX/SMTP sluthing). Give it a try: http://bit.ly/KLZKxD

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3 Answers 3

Algorithm seems reasonable. You will get best results running from unfiltered server (meaning it has direct SMTP outbound / doesn't run through a proxy). If running from client (mobile/tablet/desktop), then no guarantees as some ISP's pass SMTP through a proxy relay hence EHLO response is only for proxy.

You may want to do a port check for servers to verify expected protocol support (just a TCP connect may be sufficient but protocol handshake is preferable). Additionally, best to build up a database of verified SMTP and IMAP server mappings as there can be split names (e.g. smtp.domain.com and mail.domain.com) - discovering SMTP is easy, discovering outbound server(s) which usually also means calendar/contacts server, not so much (except for Exchange but only if autodiscovery is configured correctly).

If you can get your users to approve and assuming you have their username/password, you could try connecting to SMTP via MX record and sending an email back to your own address then checking through headers for useful info about the server (needs to be authenticated to relay). Users could alternatively reply to an email you generate in order to get the same server info.

Also ensure that you do your own DNS query and try each MX record or all primaries -- if the principal MX is down or DNS is poorly configured for equal weighting, you could end up hitting a smarthost / backup which may just be a dumb SMTP relay / store-and-forward and not give you the correct response.

TL;DR: No quick solution but a cascaded algorithm that trys and fails different solutions until one works / gives an expected result should work.

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Most devices can auto detect the service by parsing the Whole e-mail address. Xyz@gmail.com would obviously be a gmail account. So for Apple, Gmail, Yahoo, Live, Hotmail etc you can easily program for. For other domains, including custom, you can try this: http://www.exclamationsoft.com/exclamationsoft/netmailbot/help/website/HowToFindTheSMTPMailServerForAnEmailAddress.html

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You can detect Google Apps For Your Domain accounts by examining the domain's MX records. If the primary MX record is ASPMX.L.GOOGLE.com, then it's GMail.

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