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When I obtain an access_token from the Google API, it comes with an expires_in value. According to the documentation, this value indicates "The remaining lifetime of the access token".

What are the units of this value?

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7  
Because 99.9% of the time when you have a number representing time it's either seconds or subdivision of it, and milli/microseconds makes no sense for this case? –  Venge Apr 30 '12 at 22:19
2  
@FrankLaRosa : is there any way to set expiry of access token to unlimited. –  hardik Oct 20 '13 at 18:50

4 Answers 4

Have a look at: https://developers.google.com/accounts/docs/OAuth2UserAgent#handlingtheresponse

It says:

Other parameters included in the response include expires_in and token_type. These parameters describe the lifetime of the token in seconds...

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what token does expires_in refer to: access token or refresh token? –  Alexander Supertramp Sep 6 '14 at 17:08
    
@AlexanderSupertramp that should refer to access token as a refresh token is used to get new access tokens when the user is offline. –  Jeremy Thiesen Oct 29 '14 at 23:31

The spec says seconds:

http://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-ietf-oauth-v2-22#section-4.2.2

I agree with OP that it's careless for Google to not document this.

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PHP

    $has_expired=true;

    if( isset($_SESSION['token']) ){

        $token=json_decode($_SESSION['token'],true);

        $expires_in=$token['expires_in'];
        $created=$token['created'];

            if( ( $expires_in + $created - time() ) > 0){

                    $has_expired=false;

            }   
    }   
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Since there is no accepted answer I will try to answer this one:

[s] - seconds
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