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Was asked today why I used code like this for my bll classes in an asp.net app:

public class StudentBll
{
    public static DataTable GetStudents()
    {
        return DBHelper.ExecuteSp("GetStudents");
    }
    public static DataTable GetStudentById(int studentId) 
    {
        return DBHelper.ExecuteSp("GetStudentById", studentId);
    }
}

instead of

public class StudentBll
{
    public DataTable GetStudents()
    {
        return DBHelper.ExecuteSp("GetStudents");
    }
    public DataTable GetStudentById(int studentId) 
    {
        return DBHelper.ExecuteSp("GetStudentById", studentId);
    }
}

Only thing I could think of was that

A) Performance A slight increase (not sure of the specifics)

B) Readability StudentBll.GetStudents(); rather than

StudentBll studentBll = new StudentBll();
studentBll.GetStudents();

I wasn't too confident in those answers, however. Anyone care to enlighten me?

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Does StudentBll also has any static members? –  Tim Schmelter Apr 30 '12 at 22:24
    
@TimSchmelter - It only contains public static methods. –  O.O Apr 30 '12 at 22:26
    
what does BLL stand for? –  payo Apr 30 '12 at 22:40
    
    
@TimSchmelter thanks, never used the tla for that (we just call it the business layer) meh, potato pahtahto –  payo Apr 30 '12 at 22:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With respect to performance, if you can't show what the increase is, then it does not support your claim. One could also argue that the performance gain by a static method call vs an instance method call is negligible to that of the round-trip travel & database time.

You've also locked down your implementation (or at least forced the consumers to do something harder to modify). If you lost the static methods and code to an interface, testers and developers of different tiers could build mocks so they wouldn't be forced to use whatever you provide them.

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Austin - true, this was not designed for testing, as all tests in this case are integration tests with the sprocs. I see your points, however. –  O.O May 1 '12 at 0:08

Testability is the first thing that comes to my mind, when I see public static methods. Also forget about oop - no inheritance here (both classes and interfaces) thus you don't have class instances. No inheritance means no abstraction. No abstraction means tight coupling.

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