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Imagine I have a class Family. It contains a List of Person. Each (class) Person contains a (class) Address. Each (class) Address contains a (class) PostalCode. Any "intermediate" class can be null.

So, is there a simple way to get to PostalCode without having to check for null in every step? i.e., is there a way to avoid the following daisy chaining code? I know there's not "native" Java solution, but was hoping if anyone knows of a library or something. (checked Commons & Guava and didn't see anything)

if(family != null) {
    if(family.getPeople() != null) {
        if(family.people.get(0) != null) {
            if(people.get(0).getAddress() != null) {
                if(people.get(0).getAddress().getPostalCode() != null) {
                    //FINALLY MADE IT TO DO SOMETHING!!!
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

No, can't change the structure. It's from a service I don't have control over.

No, I can't use Groovy and it's handy "Elvis" operator.

No, I'd prefer not to wait for Java 8 :D

I can't believe I'm the first dev ever to get sick 'n tired of writing code like this, but I haven't been able to find a solution.

Ideas?

Thanks

--
llappall

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, you're stuck. Some people use the trinary conditional operator to make it a little less dense, but it's still the same bytecode, just harder to read. – Paul Tomblin Apr 30 '12 at 22:32
3  
"I can't believe I'm the first dev ever to get sick 'n tired of writing code like this" Well, you're not. – user1329572 Apr 30 '12 at 22:34
    
Sure. But I don't believe you can more beaty the code! Sorry! – Paul Vargas Apr 30 '12 at 22:37
2  
Despite all of the answers telling you to ignore null checks and just try to catch a NullPointerException, don't do it! Your code may be an eyesore, but throwing an exception is an expensive operation that you always want to avoid if you can. – Jeffrey Apr 30 '12 at 22:47
1  
Also, consider all the good things you can do in "else" clauses if you put them in place - error messaging, alternative code paths, etc. Given all that, it won't look as bad. – mazaneicha Apr 30 '12 at 23:03

Your code behaves the same as

if(family != null &&
  family.getPeople() != null &&
  family.people.get(0) != null && 
  family.people.get(0).getAddress() != null &&
  family.people.get(0).getAddress().getPostalCode() != null) { 
       //My Code
}

Thanks to short circuiting evaluation, this is also safe, since the second condition will not be evaluated if the first is false, the 3rd won't be evaluated if the 2nd is false,.... and you will not get NPE because if it.

share|improve this answer
    
null allways want to stay in our codes! – Paul Vargas Apr 30 '12 at 22:40

The closest you can get is to take advantage of the short-cut rules in conditionals:

if(family != null && family.getPeople() != null && family.people.get(0) != null  && family.people.get(0).getAddress() != null && family.people.get(0).getAddress().getPostalCode() != null) {
                    //FINALLY MADE IT TO DO SOMETHING!!!

}

By the way, catching an exception instead of testing the condition in advance is a horrible idea.

share|improve this answer
    
you've got some accessive } there (forgot to remove them when refactored) – amit Apr 30 '12 at 22:47
    
Thanks, @amit. Fixed now. – Paul Tomblin Apr 30 '12 at 23:14

If it is rare you could ignore the null checks and rely on NullPointerException. "Rare" due to possible performance problem (depends, usually will fill in stack trace which can be expensive).

Other than that 1) a specific helper method that checks for null to clean up that code or 2) Make generic approach using reflection and a string like:

checkNonNull(family, "people[0].address.postalcode")

Implementation left as an exercise.

share|improve this answer
    
Reflection isn't exactly cheap either. – Paul Tomblin Apr 30 '12 at 23:16
    
Yes indeed it can be slow as well @paul . Especially method lookup etc. Actual method invocation though can be quite fast, but again it depends (other optimizations might be harder for the VM). So cacheing the method/field lookups is usually important from my experience if it is needed. Most of all it of course depends on how often the code is used at all. – Mattias Isegran Bergander May 1 '12 at 20:04

Instead of using null, you could use some version of the "null object" design pattern. For example:

public class Family {
    private final PersonList people;
    public Family(PersonList people) {
        this.people = people;
    }

    public PersonList getPeople() {
        if (people == null) {
            return PersonList.NULL;
        }
        return people;
    }

    public boolean isNull() {
        return false;
    }

    public static Family NULL = new Family(PersonList.NULL) {
        @Override
        public boolean isNull() {
            return true;
        }
    };
}


import java.util.ArrayList;

public class PersonList extends ArrayList<Person> {
    @Override
    public Person get(int index) {
        Person person = null;
        try {
            person = super.get(index);
        } catch (ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
            return Person.NULL;
        }
        if (person == null) {
            return Person.NULL;
        } else {
            return person;
        }
    }
    //... more List methods go here ...

    public boolean isNull() {
        return false;
    }

    public static PersonList NULL = new PersonList() {
        @Override
        public boolean isNull() {
            return true;
        }
    };
}

public class Person {
    private Address address;

    public Person(Address address) {
        this.address = address;
    }

    public Address getAddress() {
        if (address == null) {
            return Address.NULL;
        }
        return address;
    }
    public boolean isNull() {
        return false;
    }

    public static Person NULL = new Person(Address.NULL) {
        @Override
        public boolean isNull() {
            return true;
        }
    };
}

etc etc etc

Then your if statement can become:

if (!family.getPeople().get(0).getAddress().getPostalCode.isNull()) {...}

It's suboptimal since:

  • You're stuck making NULL objects for every class,
  • It's hard to make these objects generic, so you're stuck making a null-object version of each List, Map, etc that you want to use, and
  • There are potentially some funny issues with subclassing and which NULL to use.

But if you really hate your == nulls, this is a way out.

share|improve this answer

Not such a cool idea, but how about catching the exception:

    try 
    {
        PostalCode pc = people.get(0).getAddress().getPostalCode();
    }
    catch(NullPointerException ex)
    {
        System.out.println("Gotcha");
    }
share|improve this answer

I was just looking for the same thing (my context: a bunch of automatically created JAXB classes, and somehow I have these long daisy-chains of .getFoo().getBar().... Invariably, once in a while one of the calls in the middle return null, causing NPE.

Something I started fiddling with a while back is based on reflection. I'm sure we can make this prettier and more efficient (caching the reflection, for one thing, and also defining "magic" methods such as ._all to automatically iterate on all the elements of a collection, if some method in the middle returns a collection). Not pretty, but perhaps somebody could tell us if there is already something better out there:

/**
 * Using {@link java.lang.reflect.Method}, apply the given methods (in daisy-chain fashion)
 * to the array of Objects x.
 * 
 * <p>For example, imagine that you'd like to express:
 * 
 * <pre><code>
 * Fubar[] out = new Fubar[x.length];
 * for (int i=0; {@code i<x.length}; i++) {
 *   out[i] = x[i].getFoo().getBar().getFubar();
 * }
 * </code></pre>
 * 
 * Unfortunately, the correct code that checks for nulls at every level of the
 * daisy-chain becomes a bit convoluted.
 * 
 * <p>So instead, this method does it all (checks included) in one call:
 * <pre><code>
 * Fubar[] out = apply(new Fubar[0], x, "getFoo", "getBar", "getFubar");
 * </code></pre>
 * 
 * <p>The cost, of course, is that it uses Reflection, which is slower than
 * direct calls to the methods.
 * @param type the type of the expected result
 * @param x the array of Objects
 * @param methods the methods to apply
 * @return
 */
@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
public static <T> T[] apply(T[] type, Object[] x, String...methods) {
    int n = x.length;
    try {
        for (String methodName : methods) {
            Object[] out = new Object[n];
            for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
                Object o = x[i];
                if (o != null) {
                    Method method = o.getClass().getMethod(methodName);
                    Object sub = method.invoke(o);
                    out[i] = sub;
                }
            }
            x = out;
        }
    T[] result = (T[])Array.newInstance(type.getClass().getComponentType(), n);
    for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
            result[i] = (T)x[i];
    }
            return result;
    } catch (NoSuchMethodException | IllegalAccessException | IllegalArgumentException | InvocationTargetException e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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