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Everyone want me to be more specific. I am attempting to do pagination with asp classic and ms-access database. This is the query I am using to get the items for page 2. there are 25 items per page and when the query returns larger data sets like around 500+ this is taking about 20+ seconds to execute and yes I have made sku indexed for faster queries. any suggestions.

SELECT TOP 25 *
FROM catalog
WHERE sku LIKE '1W%'
AND sku NOT IN (SELECT TOP 25 sku
                FROM catalog
                WHERE sku LIKE '1W%' ORDER BY price DESC ) ORDER BY price DESC
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2  
What DBMS are you using? –  srgerg May 1 '12 at 0:04
1  
TOP without ORDER BY is rather strange. –  ypercube May 1 '12 at 1:47
    
TOP implies (most probably) SQL-Server or MS-Access. Which one is it? –  ypercube May 1 '12 at 1:55
1  
It looks like you're doing paging. If you're using SQL 2005 or later or current versions of Sybase (@ypercube that uses TOP too) you might want to look at this article Server Side Paging using SQL Server 2005 –  Conrad Frix May 1 '12 at 2:48
    
You could/should remove the asp-classic and vbscript tags. Unless you are seeking an answer in ASP or VBScript. –  ypercube May 2 '12 at 17:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Some pointers:

  • You can simulate a SELECT BOTTOM (n) by using TOP (n) and reversing the ORDER BY
  • You can use nested SELECTs (creating a temporary table)

So, the final result of the "paging" query is (replace 50 with 75, 100, 125, ... for subsequent pages):

SELECT TOP 25 *
FROM
(
SELECT TOP 50 *
FROM  catalog
WHERE sku LIKE '1W%'
ORDER BY price desc
)
TEMP
ORDER BY price asc;

Although you mentioned you've indexed your data, but, just to be completely clear, for optimal performance, you should ensure all your table is adequately indexed for your query. In this case, I would recommend, AT LEAST the two columns involved in the query:

CREATE INDEX IX_CATALOG ON CATALOG (SKU, PRICE);
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TOP without ORDER BY looks useless or at least strange. I guess youo meant to use this subquery:

( SELECT TOP 25 sku
  FROM catalog
  WHERE sku LIKE '1W%' 
  ORDER BY sku
)

Add an index on sku, if you haven't one.

A possible rewriting of the query, for Access:

SELECT *
FROM catalog
WHERE sku LIKE '1W%'
AND sku >= ( SELECT MAX(sku)
             FROM ( SELECT TOP 26 sku
                    FROM catalog
                    WHERE sku LIKE '1W%' 
                    ORDER BY sku 
                  )
           )

If you are using SQL-Server, you can use window functions for this type of query.

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What you're trying to do is select all the rows from a table, that meet a certain criteria, other than the first twenty-five. Unfortunately, different database management systems have their own syntax for doing this kind of thing.

There is a good survey of the different syntaxes on the Wikipedia page for the SQL select statement.

To give an example, in MySQL you can use the LIMIT clause of the SELECT statement to specify how many rows to return and the offset:

SELECT *
FROM catalog
WHERE sku LIKE '1W%'
ORDER by id
LIMIT 25, 9999999999

which returns rows 26 to 9999999999 of the query results.

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would love to use limit and offset however this is on a ms-access database –  kricket May 2 '12 at 21:28

Create an index on the column sku (if valid make it unique). How many rows are there in the table?

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SELECT sku
FROM catalog
WHER sku LIKE '1W%
ORDER BY __SOME COLUMN __
LIMIT 10000 OFFSET 25

This is returning all* the rows in the database that are after row 25 (OFFSET 25).

*LIMIT 10000 constraints the resulting query to 10000 tuples (rows).

To ensure you are not getting a random OFFSET, you would need to order by some column.

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